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Microsoft word - diploma in small animal medicine _feline_ webpack 2008.doc

Diploma in Small Animal Medicine (Feline)
Enrolment for this Diploma is no longer available. The following information is for reference
for currently enrolled candidates who have not yet passed the examination.

Please view the general documents to obtain copies of:
Guidance Notes for candidates on general requirements. Role of Advisers to Certificate Candidates.
The following papers are enclosed:

B.2:
Specific Guidance Notes for the Diploma. These notes explain what is required in terms of experience and in terms of the content of the Diploma examinations. Syllabus and Commentary for the Diploma.
D: Reading
E.1A - for specific details of practice
E.2 - for final approval of experience and for permission to submit an entry to
the examination

A copy of the most recent Examination Question Paper is enclosed for your information.

April 2008
B.2 – 2008

The Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons

The Diploma in Small Animal Medicine – FELINE
Specific guidance notes for candidates
[These notes must be read in conjunction with the B1 General Guidance Notes to Candidates]
Membership of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons

1. It is a requirement of the Small Animal Surgery Board that ALL Candidates entering for the Diploma are Members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (MRCVS).
Specific Experience

2. Forms E1A and E2 seek information on the experience which is being or has been 3. If you are working in a practice which is not solely or mainly specialist feline medicine you are advised to obtain periods of experience in centres or practices other than your own, to supplement the experience you gain in your normal working situation - rather in the nature of short clinical attachments. In a similar vein, if you are working in referral or teaching centres without access to the rigours and demands of unsupported first opinion practice you are advised to obtain experience in such a situation. You should expect that a longer period of experience than the minimum of 4 years could well be specified by the Board in such cases. Experience would therefore, not necessarily be approved in the first instance. 4. Normally, candidates may gain experience for the Diploma at (a) an approved centre for their subject or (b) at an approved practice.
Approved Practice Route

5. If you are following the approved practice route you will not be permitted to enter for the examination until you have been a Member of the College or held an approved
veterinary qualification for at least five years and are required to offer experience in the
subject over at least five years which must include 200 days at an approved centre.
6. You must ensure that the Centre where you are proposing to spend 200 days has been approved by the Board. Centres currently approved are listed below. Please note it is up to the Centre to apply for “Approved” status. 7. There is no separate application form other than the candidate applications forms included with this Information Pack. Practices are approved for each individual candidate. Approved Centre Route

8. If you are following the approved training programme at an approved centre you will not be permitted to enter for the examination until you have been a Member of the
College or held an approved veterinary qualification for at least four years. You are
required to offer experience in the subject over at least four years.
9. The Board has discretion to increase the requirements for experience for any candidate above the minimum specified if it is considered to benefit the candidate. 10. Centres currently approved for this Diploma are listed below: • Animal Health Trust • University of Bristol • University of Cambridge • University of Edinburgh • University of Glasgow • University of Liverpool • The Royal Veterinary College, University of London 11. Candidates would normally be holders of the Certificate in Small Animal Medicine. At the Board’s discretion, experience gained for the Certificate may count towards the experience required for this Diploma.
Advisers

12. You should approach an adviser and obtain an agreement that you can work with them on a daily basis for the necessary period to complete the training programme. Advisers must be asked to sign all application forms before these are submitted to RCVS, thereby indicting that you have made contact with them and that they are willing to act as your adviser.
Format of the Examination

13. The examination consists of three sections: Submitted work: a published paper and a case report A clinical, oral and practical examination.
Submitted Work

14. By 1 March, you are required to submit: • One principle author paper involving relevant original work, published in a
refereed journal, which has not been previously submitted for any other RCVS
qualification. Please note that reprints from the journal are preferred, but if the
paper is “in press”, a letter from the Editor confirming unconditional acceptance
(i.e. no further amendments of any sort) must be supplied. You are advised
when submitting papers for publication, to allow time to receive and incorporate
scrutineers’ comments and amendments.
• Candidates should note that short communications will not be accepted as a
published for the purposes of Section (a). • Candidates MUST submit a supporting introduction, with all published papers
submitted for the examination, stating the relevance of the paper in relation to
other published papers on the subject and its clinical relevance to the
speciality.

• Candidates are expected to submit good quality reproductions of
published papers, so that all photographs and diagrams are clearly shown. • One case report in a form suitable for publication in which you are the
principal author. Although it is acceptable for the case report to have been
published, that case should demonstrate your ability to assess and discuss a case
critically. The subject matter of the submitted work must receive the approval of
the Board prior to submission of the papers; this takes place with the application
for final approval of experience (E2).
• Candidates who are submitting a published case report are advised to re-write the case report to demonstrate their own view of the case. 15. It is important to realise that work which has already been submitted for another postgraduate qualification, including the Diploma of Fellowship by Thesis, cannot be used towards an RCVS Diploma. However, publications in peer reviewed journals arising from any postgraduate degree, for example, a PhD or Masters thesis, can sometimes be used towards a subsequent Diploma if publications of this type form part of the Diploma requirements and are appropriate to the discipline – this decision to be made by the relevant Subject Board. 16. You must submit THREE collated sets of your submitted work in a secure cover. If you
do not gain sufficient marks in Section (a), you will not be permitted to proceed to the other parts of the examination. If you are successful in the examination as a whole, one copy of your submitted work will be retained in the RCVS Library. 17. The case report must be typed/word processed in double-spacing on A4 size paper. 18. Candidates are asked to submit an electronic version of their submitted work together with their hard copy. This will be retained at RCVS unless requested by the examiners for purposes such as checking the word count. The electronic version should be Microsoft Office 2000 or XP compatible and should be submitted on either CD or floppy disc/s. Please ensure that the disks are easily identifiable by placing them in an envelope with your name, and ‘Electronic version of submitted work for the Diploma in Small Animal Medicine (Feline)’ marked clearly on the front. Grading Scheme

19. The submitted work will be graded “Good Pass”; “Pass” or “Fail”: • Good Pass (60% or over) -- the work will be lodged in the RCVS Library as a suitable
Pass (defined as 50%) – The work is acceptable to allow the candidate to proceed to the
remaining sections of the examination, but the work must be revised by the date of the clinical, oral and practical in order that it can be lodged in the RCVS Library if the candidate is successful in the examination as a whole. • Fail (below 50%) – The work is judged to be of an inadequate standard for the Diploma,
and the candidate will not be allowed to proceed to the remaining sections of the examination in the year in question.
Written Examination

20. The format of the written papers will be as follows: (3 hours) comprising 18 compulsory short-answer questions designed to assess knowledge across the range of the syllabus. Paper II –
(3 hours) 4 out of 5 essay type questions, with some choice, designed to assess deeper understanding and problem solving ability. 21. You will need to make sure that your handwriting in the examination is legible -- you
Clinical, oral and practical

22. The clinical, oral and practical examination will extend over approximately four hours 23. This section of the examination will include a ‘steeplechase’ consisting of questions based on diagnostic images, specimens, clinical pathological data etc. 24. You will have a clinical and oral examination at which questions may be asked in relation to your submitted work. You are reminded that good communication skills are important, whether in institutions or in practice. 25. White coats should be taken to the clinical, oral, practical examinations. 26. Candidates should be aware that they may be questioned on their knowledge of current information at any stage of the examination. 27. Candidates are warned that the oral part of this stage of the examination will be 28. Candidates are advised to allow adequate time before the examination to visit their Advisers, in order to prepare for this stage of the examination.

Attendance at short courses, etc.

29. Although there is provision in the byelaws to make attendance at courses or the acquisition of credits compulsory for those wishing to take the Diploma examination, the Board is not as yet introducing such compulsory requirements. However, the Board wishes to encourage you to attend any appropriate short courses and any other events, such as congresses, symposia and meeting which are relevant to small animal medicine and would be of benefit to your studies. 30. Such attendance is taken into account by the Board when considering your application
Abbreviation for qualification

31. Successful candidates for the Diploma in Small Animal Medicine (Feline) are permitted
to use the abbreviation “DSAM(Fel)” after their names, in the RCVS Register of
Members, and on practice plate, stationery, etc.


Originated 1994, Reviewed Feb 01/Nov 01/ Feb 03/Feb04/Jan05/January 2006/2007/2008


THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS
DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (FELINE)
- COMMENTARY AND SYLLABUS

Commentary

1. The Diploma in Feline Medicine training programme is designed so that knowledge, skill and understanding in feline medicine is acquired to the level expected of an expert through exposure to a wide variety of diseases under the close supervision and guidance of Diplomates, or approved experts with equivalent training or experience, in feline medicine. 2. It is expected that candidates have gained the Certificate in Small Animal Medicine and that they therefore have a knowledge of the topics covered by the syllabus of the Certificate in Small Animal Medicine pertaining to feline medicine. Diploma candidates should have achieved higher standards in their depth of knowledge, level of expertise and breadth of training in the aspects of feline medicine than that covered by the Certificate in Small Animal Medicine. Candidates should also be able to demonstrate an up-to-date understanding of scientific principles and literature pertaining to the practice of small animal medicine. 3. Welfare and ethical considerations in the treatment of feline cases candidates are reminded of their commitment, as registered members of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, to pay attention to the welfare of animals under their care. 4. Candidates should be familiar with the basic science of medical diseases (anatomy, biochemistry, physiology, pharmacology, pathology> and have a thorough understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of disease of all the body systems, particularly as they relate to cats. 5. The training programme should allow candidates to assume total responsibility for initial consultation, planning, execution and interpretation of diagnostic procedures, and daily management of hospitalised cats. (Note: Candidates must be able to produce documentation to demonstrate that they have participated in a training programme at an Approved centre for the appropriate period of time.)
Syllabus


1. MANIFESTATIONS OF CLINICAL DISEASE

• Clinical diseases, their pathophysiology and diagnostic approach. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying pathophysiology of diseases and the use of problem-orientated solving for diagnostic planning.
2. THERAPEUTICS
• Therapeutic management of feline cases. • Knowledge of specific metabolic features of the cat which influence pharmocotherapy.
3. EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE
The training programme should include: • participation in a small animal medicine critical care unit where intensive care of feline • knowledge of the indications and application of fluid therapy, respiratory and nutritional • the candidate is expected to have knowledge of the monitoring of respiratory function, cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure, central venous pressure, cardiac output), renal perfusion I function and temperature; • interpretation of blood gas analysis results and assessment of metabolic and/or endocrine • diagnosis and management of toxicological emergencies; • appreciation of indications for surgical intervention.
4. CLINICAL PATHOLOGY
• Techniques for collection and handling of samples for laboratory tests. • Establish indications for and interpretation of haematological, biochemical, organ • Knowledge of specific metabolic features of the cat and their influence on the • Principles and interpretation of diagnostic cytology from fine needle aspirates, abdominocentesis, diagnostic peritoneal lavage, thoracocentesis, tracheal and bronchoalveolar lavage, synovial samples, CSF and urine. • Principles and interpretation of basic histopathofogy, immunological testing and
5. DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING
• Principles, applications and interpretation of radiology and ultrasonography, including • Selection and limitations of procedures used for diagnosis. • Principles and applications of contrast techniques including gastrointestinal studies, cystography, excretory urography, angiography, myel ography and portography. • Understand the basic principles and some knowledge of CT, MRI and scintigraphy 6. CARDIOVASCULAR DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the cardiovascular system.
• Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids (ECG,
radiology, echocardiography including Doppler studies, angiography, pericardiocentesis). • Diagnosis and management of congenital and acquired feline heart disease. • Interpretation and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.
7. RESPIRATORY DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the respiratory system.
• Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids
(radiology, bronchoscopy, tracheal and bronchoalveolar lavages, thoracocentesis, chest drains, lung biopsy/fine needle aspirate). • Diagnosis and management of feline respiratory disorders.
8. GASTROINTESTINAL DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the gastrointestinal system including the liver and pancreas.
• Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids
(laboratory tests, radiology, endoscopy, ultrasonography, biopsies/fine needle aspirates, abdominocentesis, diagnostic peritoneal lavage) • Diagnosis and management of feline gastrointestinal, hepatic and pancreatic disorders.
9. ENDOCRINE AND METABOLIC DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the endocrine system.
• Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids
(laboratory testing including endocrine testing, radiology, ultrasonography). • Diagnosis and management of feline endocrine and metabolic disorders.
10. UROGENITAL DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the urogenital system. • Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids (laboratory testing, cystocentesis, radiology, u ltrasonography, blood pressure monitoring). • Diagnosis and management of feline urogenital disorders.
11. NEUROLOGICAL AND NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the nervous system. • Localisation of lesions based upon neuroanatomy. • Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids (CSF • Some knowledge of the indications and principles of electrodiagnostic testing (EMG, • Diagnosis and management of feline neurological disorders. 12. HAEMOPOIETIC DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the haemopoietic systems. • Principles and indications for, performance and interpretation of diagnostic aids (immunological testing, blood smear cytology, bone marrow aspiration and core biopsy sampling, tests for haemostasis). • Diagnosis and management of feline haemopoietic disorders. • Blood transfusion therapy. • An understanding of the involvement of FeLV and FIV infection in feline haemopoietic
13. INFECTIOUS DISEASES

• Diagnosis and management of feline infectious diseases, including therapy for retroviral • Principles and indications for diagnostic tests for feline infectious diseases and an understanding of the interpretation of the different testing methods available. • Knowledge of the epidemiology and control of feline infectious agents in catteries, breeding establishments and pet households. • Knowledge of feline zoonotic diseases and diseases of public health importance, their
14. MEDICAL ONCOLOGY
• Clinical evaluation and staging of the feline cancer patient. • Approach to the treatment of feline cancer patients including chemotherapy and • Some knowledge of other treatment modalities for cancer such as hyperthermia, cryotherapy, photodynamic therapy and gene therapy. • An understanding of the involvement of FeLV infection in feline oncology. • Management of cancer in FeLV and FIV positive cats.
15. CLINICAL NUTRITION
• Principles and applications of dietary management of the cat including enteral and • An understanding of the specific nutritional requirements of cats, particularly as compared to dogs, and diseases which may arise from nutritional imbalances.
16. PAEDIATRIC MEDICINE
• Diagnosis, management, prevention and screening for diseases of kittens including congenital anomalies, nutritional disorders, infectious diseases and causes of fading kitten syndrome. • Knowledge of laboratory reference ranges for normal kittens.
17. GERIATRIC MEDICINE
• The effects of ageing on the body systems and the diagnosis, management, prevention and screening of diseases of the older cat.
18. OPHTI-IALMOLOGICAL DISORDERS
• Clinical evaluation of the eye. • Recognition, diagnosis and management of ocular manifestations of systemic disease in • Knowledge of commom ophthalmology diseases. 19. DERMATOLOGICAL DISORDERS

• Recognition, diagnosis and management of dermatological manifestations of systemic • Knowledge of common dermatological diseases.
20. POPULATION MEDICINE
• Strategies for the control of infectious agents in catteries and breeding establishments. The use of vaccination and health programmes in multicat households. • Epidemiological investigations of disease in feline populations. • Basic knowledge of statistical analysis of interpretation of diagnostic test results. March 2000 (reformatted and revised March 2001)
THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS

DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (FELINE)
THE ADVISER MUST SIGN BELOW THAT THE CANDIDATE HAS CARRIED OUT AND IS PROFICIENT IN EACH OF
THE FOLLOWING TECHNIQUES AND PROCEDURES.


TECHNIQUE OR PROCEDURE
SIGNATURE OF ADVISER
Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy Lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy Thoracocentesis and management of a thoracic
drain

June 2000
ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS
SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (FELINE) - RECOMMENDED READING LIST FOR THE
DIPLOMA


Candidates should note that the reading list for the Diploma in Small Animal Medicine
(Feline) was frozen in 2002 and has now been withdrawn. Candidates are expected to
research the literature for themselves and are recommended to make use of the RCVS Library and Information Service for this purpose (http://www.rcvslibrary.org.uk/, e-mail - library@rcvs.org.uk or telephone 020 7222 2021). Candidates should also seek advice on suitable reading matter from their advisers. January 2006 PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU COMPLETE A FORM E1 (TO BE FOUND IN THE COMMON
DOCUMENTS) AND ATTACH IT TO THIS FORM

THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS

SPECIALISATION AND FURTHER EDUCATION

DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE / DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE - FELINE
(Please delete as appropriate)

Details of the establishment in which experience is being gained to meet the
requirements of the byelaws for the Diploma in Small Animal Medicine
(If more than one practice/establishment, please photocopy this form and complete in respect of
each such establishment)
1.
Experience: Please tick the route by which experience is being gained (see paper B2, paras. 6-9) Approved practice route with 200 days experience gained at an
approved centre*

• Approved centre • Name of approved centre: ii) Approved centre route*
*N.B. Applications for approval as an approved centre must be made by the centre directly to RCVS and not by the candidate. An application form can be obtained from RCVS. Number of veterinary surgeons working in small animals at your place of employment: Percentage of practice case load which you personally undertake: Percentage and number of hours per week spent by the applicant on work relevant
to the Diploma syllabus during practice hours:

Main items of equipment and facilities available for the examination and treatment of small animal medical cases are as follows: Diagnostic
Type of examinations
Approximate number
Facilities
Equipment
Performed
of cases per year

Radiology
*If commercial laboratories are used, please indicate the approximate number of samples submitted per year and the range of tests requested (on a separate sheet). Please indicate the facilities and equipment available for managing the critically ill patient (on a separate sheet, if necessary) Library Facilities
Do you have regular use of a University/College/Institute library with a veterinary section? Where? PLEASE RETURN ORIGINAL FORM PLUS FOUR COPIES
THE FOLLOWING SECTION SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY YOUR
ADVISER
I have agreed that this candidate will be advised by me and note that it is the candidate’s responsibility to approach me as necessary. Important Notes
• Please ensure you have enclosed the correct fee, completed (original) forms E1 and E1A plus
four collated photocopies that are clear and of a good quality. • Please ensure that your Adviser has signed these forms BEFORE you return them to RCVS • Candidates will be advised of the outcome of their application no later than mid-January and are requested not to telephone or write for this information in the interim. • If you require an acknowledgement, please enclose a stamped addressed envelope.

THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS

SPECIALISATION AND FURTHER EDUCATION

DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE / DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE - FELINE
(Please delete as appropriate)
Application for FINAL approval of experience and permission to submit an entry to the next
examination

This form must be completed and returned to the RCVS, Belgravia House, 62-64 Horseferry
Road, London SW1P 2AF by 1 November prior to the year in which you wish to enter the
examination. Your application should be accompanied by five collated photocopies of the
completed form. The photocopies should be clear and of a good standard. N.B. No late
applications will be accepted.
1. NAME

2. DEGREES/DIPLOMAS/CERTIFICATES
(in abbrev. form) and date obtained

3. ADDRESS for all correspondence (block letters)
(a) TELEPHONE No(s) (for
No. (for contact during day)
DATE OF ENROLMENT
If application for enrolment is being submitted concurrently with this application QUALIFICATION FOR ENTRY
If Yes, please state veterinary degree obtained, name of awarding University, and date of graduation and date of obtaining Membership: If No, please give details of the veterinary qualification which you hold which entitles you to
practise veterinary surgery in your home country (i.e. full title, recognised abbreviation, awarding University or other examining body, date obtained, length of the course): EXPERIENCE: Please tick the route by which experience has been gained.(see paper B2, paras. 6-9)
Approved practice route - 200 days experience gained at an approved centre* *N.B. Applications for approval as an approved centre must be made by the centre directly to the RCVS and not by the candidate. An application form can be obtained from RCVS. PERIODS OF EXPERIENCE BEING OFFERED to meet the requirements of the byelaws
Name and address of Veterinary
Period of employment
Practice and/or Approved
(from/to)
Certified by Principal
If there has been any change in the work-load of the establishment, or in your personal work- load, since you applied for enrolment, please give details below: ATTENDANCE AT RELEVANT SHORT COURSES
Candidates must attach six photocopies of their RCVS CPD Record Card for each year for which they are applying for Final Approval of Experience. Details of all relevant short courses, conferences and meetings attended should be recorded on the Record Card. Candidates must comply with the annual recommended minimum hours of CPD otherwise final approval of experience and permission to sit the next examination will not be granted. OTHER INVOLVEMENT IN RELATION TO SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE
List below any other relevant courses, conferences, congresses, meetings, symposia etc. which are not detailed on your RCVS Record Card. Attendance at relevant congresses, conferences, meetings,
symposia, etc
Date and Venue

11. PUBLICATIONS/ARTICLES/PAPERS/LECTURES

Give details below (including any involvement in the instruction of others): OTHER POSTGRADUATE STUDIES
During the period of experience being offered, have you been or are you studying for any other postgraduate qualification? YES/NO TITLES OF PUBLISHED PAPER/CASE REPORT
Please CONFIRM the titles of your submitted work
Paper 1
I HEREBY APPLY FOR FINAL APPROVAL OF EXPERIENCE AND FOR PERMISSION TO
SUBMIT AN ENTRY TO THE NEXT DIPLOMA EXAMINATION IN SMALL ANIMAL
MEDICINE.

I certify that the period of experience being offered has not been/is not being offered to meet the requirements of the byelaws for any other RCVS Certificate or Diploma. Delete section 15 if you do not intend to sit next year’s examination. CONFIRMATION OF INTENT TO SIT THE EXAMINATION
If approval of experience is granted, I do/do not (delete as appropriate) intend to submit an entry to the next examination (closing date for receipt of entries: 1 March). PLEASE RETURN ORIGINAL FORM PLUS FOUR COPIES

THE FOLLOWING SECTION SHOULD BE COMPLETED BY YOUR ADVISER
I confirm that I am acting as this candidate's Adviser.
Name
Signature


Important Notes
• Please ensure you have enclosed four collated photocopies that are clear and of a good • Please ensure that your Adviser has signed this form BEFORE you return it to RCVS • Candidates will be advised of the outcome of their application no later than mid-January and are requested not to telephone or write for this information in the interim. • If you require an acknowledgement of receipt, please enclose a stamped addressed envelope. • No late applications will be accepted. Reviewed March 01/March0
DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (Feline)

Candidates should refer to the lists of Specialists and Diploma holders published in Section 3 of
the RCVS Register of Members
April 2006
THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (FELINE)
MONDAY 9 JULY 2007

Candidates are required to answer ALL EIGHTEEN questions.
Allow 10 minutes per question.
Please start the answer to each question on a separate sheet; failure to do so could lose you
marks.
Illegible handwriting or failure to answer the questions in the form requested may result in
examiners being unable to award marks for information which candidates intended to
convey.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
Briefly describe the expected clinical presentation, confirmatory diagnostic
test(s) and specific treatments if available, for the intoxications listed below: Outline the current tests used for the diagnosis of pancreatitis in cats. For each
test indicate its reported sensitivity and specificity. ‘Hypoallergenic’ diets based on hydrolysed protein are widely used in the management of dietary hypersensitivity. Outline their immunologic basis and the
clinical evidence to support their use.
Write short notes on:
a) X-linked muscular dystrophy in Siamese cats. b) Mucopolysaccharidosis VI. c) Hyperthyroid myopathy. P.T.O. FOR QUESTIONS 5 - 12
In the assessment of feline cardiovascular disease the following diagnostic tests are
described. Write short notes on their diagnostic value:
b. Brain natriuretic peptide. c. Vertebral heart score. List FOUR common presenting findings in cats with nasal adenocarcinoma. Outline
the treatment options available. Including potential side effects and expected
Write short notes on the clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of
pulmonary fibrosis in cats.
Briefly describe the anaemia associated with:
Define constipation and obstipation. Construct a differential diagnosis LIST of the
Outline the International Renal Interest Society (IRIS) system for classification of chronic
renal failure in cats. Comment briefly on its aims and limitations.
Write short notes on hyperaldosteronism in cats.
A 14 year-old neutered female domestic short-hair (DSH) cat presents with a recent history of weight loss despite a good appetite. Physical examination reveals mild tachycardia (200 bpm), a grade I-II/VI systolic heart murmur and a small mass palpable in the region of the left thyroid gland. Serum biochemistry and routine haematology are unremarkable and total T4 is 48 nmol/l (reference range 15 – 59 mmol/l): LIST other major differential diagnoses you would consider in this case.
LIST the tests that can be used to further elucidate the cat’s thyroid function.
Comment briefly on their advantages and limitations of each test.
P.T.O. FOR QUESTIONS 13 – 18
An 8 year-old male neutered Persian cat presents with acute onset urethral obstruction of
approximately 12 hour duration. Briefly describe your approach to the investigation and
management of this case.
Write short notes on plasma cell pododermatitis in the cat.
Briefly outline the pathogenesis of pyometra and the options for treatment.
A 10 year-old male neutered domestic long-hair (DLH) cat presents with a history of being “not quite right” for a few days. Ophthalmic examination reveals bilateral multi-focal retinal haemorrhages. a) LIST the major differential diagnoses.
b) Outline your approach to investigation of the case.
c) Indicate the order of priority of the tests you would recommend.
In table form:
a) LIST the tests available for identifying infection with feline immunodeficiency virus and
b) Briefly describe advantages and disadvantages/limitations for each test listed.
Briefly describe the mechanism of action, uses and potential adverse effects of:
a) Mirtazapine. b) Diazepam. c) Cyproheptadine. THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF VETERINARY SURGEONS DIPLOMA IN SMALL ANIMAL MEDICINE (FELINE)
MONDAY 9 JULY 2007

Candidates are required to answer FOUR of the following five questions.
Allow 45 minutes per question.
Please start the answer to each question on a separate sheet; failure to do so could lose you
marks.
Illegible handwriting or failure to answer the questions in the form requested may result in
examiners being unable to award marks for information which candidates intended to convey.

1.
You are presented with a 5 year-old domestic short hair (DSH) cat that has been anorexic for 3 weeks. The cat originally weighed 6kg and is now 4.5kg. The cat is showing no other overt clinical signs. Describe in detail your approach to this case. Justify the purpose and order in which
you would conduct your diagnostic investigation. LIST the options for therapeutic intervention and the timing/criteria you would use
to decide when each intervention would be appropriate. Define arthritis. Describe the various forms of arthritis reported in cats including their
treatment and the changes that you would expect on radiography and arthrocentesis.
You are approached by a Burmese breeder that has lost a number of kittens when they were
less than 2 weeks old from her 3 most recent litters born to 3 different queens. Describe in
detail
your investigation of the problem including the expected clinical presentation and
management of potential underlying causes.
Compare and contrast the virology, clinical signs, diagnosis, and management of feline
calicivirus and feline herpesvirus 1.
Give an account of the current understanding of feline inflammatory liver diseases, and the
approach to their investigation and management.

Source: https://www.rcvs.org.uk/document-library/diploma-guidance-dsamfeline/DiplomaguidanceDSAMFeline.pdf

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The objective of this paper is to discuss how to measure the role ofintergenerational transfers for wealth using cross-national comparabledata sets constructed by the Luxembourg Wealth Study (LWS) project. The most obvious use of the LWS data for studying intergenerationaltransfers is to estimate econometric models that can be used to predict“end of life” wealth. If the original data is of pan

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