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Dhc-3 otter - a history -- update 2

DHC-3 OTTER
CD-ROM UPDATE 2
Correct to 1 January 2007
As promised on the CD, periodic Updates will be published to report on
developments to the Otter fleet since the publication of the CD, the information on
which was correct to the 1st January 2005. Update 1 was issued with the CD and this
second Update brings the situation up to the 1st January 2007. It includes a listing of
all Otters currently in service and their engine type.
R-1340 = Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp (600hp piston)
Vazar = Pratt & Whitney PT6A (750 hp turbine)
Texas Turbine = Garrett TPE-331 (1,000 hp turbine)
PZL = ASz-621R-M18 (1,000 hp piston, Polish)
Walter = Walter M601 (750 hp turbine, Czech)
3
C-FODH. In service with Harbour Air, Vancouver as a Vazar turbine, fleet number
307.
7
C-GPPL. In service with Hawk Air, Wawa, Ontario. R-1340.
8
C-GSUB. In service with Cargair, St.Michel-des-Saintes, Quebec. R-1340.
10
C-FGTL. Following its crash on 11th October 1990 at Tarp Lake, Ontario while
operated by Gold Belt Air Transport, the wrecked Otter was brought to Kuby’s
Aircraft, Kenora, Ontario where it lay for many years, still painted in its original
Lambair colour scheme. In October 2005 the wrecked Otter was sold by Kuby’s
Aircraft, along with three othe r wrecked Otters, to Recon Air of Geraldton, Ontario
and all four were trucked to Geraldton for eventual rebuild or parting out.

11

N87KA. In service with Kenmore Air, Seattle as a Vazar turbine.
13
C-FODK. In service with Nestor Falls Fly-In Outpost Camps, Nestor Falls,
Ontario. R-1340.
14
C-FODJ. In service with Green Airways, Red Lake, Ontario. R-1340.
15
N150BA. In private use with Kenai River Xpress, Soldotna, Alaska, named
“Norville’s Otter”. Texas Turbine conversion # 3.
19
C-FEYY. Was one of the two Orenda-engined Otters. Still grounded since
December 2002 following the withdrawal of certification of that engine for use in the
Otter. In storage at Dolbeau, Quebec.
21
C-FRNO. In service with Harbour Air, Vancouver as a Vazar turbine Otter, fleet
number 301. An ‘airprox’ incident was recorded on 1 November 2005 involving the
Otter and C-FXEC, a Sikorsky S-61N helicopter. To quote from the incident
summary: “The Executive Air Transport helicopter operating as JBA 903 for Helijet
was maintaining three thousand feet on an IFR flight plan in IMC about ten nautical
miles south of the Vancouver VOR en route from Vancouver Harbour to Victoria
Harbour. The crew was advised of traffic at 12 o’clock, four miles at 2,400 feet.
Shortly thereafter the crew observed the Turbo Otter on floats pass close to their left
side, about one quarter mile and four hundred feet below. The Turbo Otter was
operating as HR 301 from Victoria Harbour to Vancouver Harbour, VFR at 2,500
feet. The pilot reported that visibility was reduced in rain but was still VFR. He
reported that he saw some cloud and climbed to two thousand seven hundred feet to
clear it, then observed the helicopter at 10 o’clock high. He reported that he was not
on a collision course with the helicopter and that no evasive action was necessary”.
C-FRNO is on Wipline 8000 amphibious floats and from 1 November 2006
commenced a new scheduled service from Langley Airport to Vancouver Harbour,
the only amphibious scheduled service in the region for a long time.
24
C-FIOF. Purchased by and registered to Huron Air and Outfitters Inc, Armstrong,
Ontario 15 February 2005 and in service with Huron Air. Walter turbine.
26

N26DE. Converted to a turbine Otter in 1992 by Dan Michel/All West Freight at
Sterling, Alaska with a Lycoming T-53 engine taken from a Grumman Mohawk, but
the conversion was not certified by the FAA and the aircraft remained in storage at
Sterling since 1992. Sold in August 2005 to Mike Spisak of Kotzebue, Alaska, who
also purchased Otter N338D (338), which had crashed and the wreck of which was
also in store at Sterling. Both Otters were trucked away from Sterling and N338D
subsequently restored to flying status. Current location and status of N26DE
unknown.
28
C-FSVP. Vazar turbine, which flew for Labrador Airways at Goose Bay,
Newfoundland on lease from its owner for the summer of 2002, after which it was put
into outside storage at St.Mathias-sur-Richelieu, Quebec and advertised for sale.
Asking price was CAD$1.5 million and the aircraft had 14,803 hours on the airframe.
Having remained in storage at St.Mathias for nearly four years, the Otter was sold to
Nordair Quebec 200 Inc of Radisson, Quebec to whom it was registered on 6 June
2006 and went into service with Nordair. It was purchased to replace their turbine
Otter C-FKLC (255) which had been destroyed.
30

N63354. In service with Ward Air, Juneau, Alaska as a piston Otter with the
original R-1340 engine until the end of the summer 2006 season. Arrived Vernon, BC
4 October 2006 for conversion to a Texas Turbine by Kal Air, which conversion was
carried out over the winter of 2006/07.
31
C-FAPR. In service with Ignace Airways (1996) Ltd, Ignace, Ontario. R-1340
35
ZK-VAS. In service with Volcanic Air Safaris, Rotorua, New Zealand. R-1340.
37
N606KA. Vazar turbine owned by Kenmore Air, Seattle. The Otter was damaged
on 1 June 2006 in the course of a Kenmore Air scheduled service from Lake Union,
Seattle to Victoria on Vancouver Island, with the pilot and ten passengers on board,
none of whom were injured. Instrument conditions prevailed and the incident
occurred ten minutes after the Otter had taken off, when it was over the Puget Sound
near Port Townsend, Washington. To quote from the NTSB report: “The pilot said
that as he approached Port Townsend he encountered a lowering ceiling and visibility.
He said that the water conditions were glassy smooth with no visual definition. This
condition made it increasingly difficult to be sure he was maintaining forward
visibility. He began to turn back but conditions worsened. He elected to perform a
precautionary landing on the water. He said that with no visual definition he
misjudged it and landed hard. He was unsure of the airplane’s structural condition so
he taxied it to Port Townsend. The fuselage was bent/deformed and the fuselage skin
was wrinkled and the dorsal stabilizer was bent/wrinkled”. The Otter was taken back
to the Kenmore Air base for repair and was noted there at the end of August 2006
with the wings detached from the fuselage. It was repaired in the hangar at Kenmore
over the winter of 2006/07, with the scenic windows modification incorporated at the
same time, ready to resume service in spring 2007.
39
C-GOFB. In service with Watson’s Skyways of Wawa, Ontario as a Vazar turbine.
42
C-GHAR. In service with Harbour Air, Vancouver as a Vazar turbine, fleet
number 308.
43

C-GQDU. In service with Air Saguenay, Jonquiere, Quebec. PZL engine.
44
C-FYCX. In service with Waweig Air, Armstrong, Ontario as a Vazar turbine.
46
N565TA. Following its accident at Glacier Lake, Yukon on 26 July 1983 when
registered C-FQOQ and operated by Air North, the wrecked Otter was purchased by
Waglisla Air who brought it to Vancouver, where it languished for many years, the
fuselage lying on a ramp with the wings alongside. After Wagair’s demise, it was
acquired by Pacific Aircraft Salvage of Vancouver, who sold it to Air Saguenay and
the Otter was trucked across the country to St.Jean, Quebec where a slow rebuild
commenced. By May 2000 it was advertised for sale as a rebuild project, total time
given as 8,102 hours.
The Otter was sold to Lakeland Aviation of Fort Frances, Ontario and taken by rail
from Quebec to Fort Frances where further rebuilding took place. On 24 December
2004 the Otter was registered as C-FQOQ to 1140626 Ontario Ltd (Lakeland
Aviation) and was again advertised for sale, the aircraft at this stage rebuilt but
awaiting the installation of whatever engine type a buyer wanted. Negotiations took
place for the sale of the Otter to a Canadian gentleman who was going to use the
aircraft in Saudi Arabia to fly guests to a resort, but the transaction did not proceed
when, reportedly, the Saudi authorities declined to register “such an old aircraft” and
instead a Cessna Caravan was purchased.
In August 2005 the Otter was sold to Talkeetna Air Taxi Inc of Talkeetna, Alaska
and was trucked from Fort Frances, Ontario to Vernon, BC where it arrived January
2006 and work started by Kal Air on converting the Otter to a Texas Turbine
(conversion # 24). Work continued during the following months and on 25 April 2006
number 46 was registered N565TA to Talkeetna Air Taxi. It departed Vernon en route
to its new home at Talkeetna, Alaska in mid May 2006, returning to flying after a
grounding which had lasted all of 23 years. Talkeetna Air Taxi has a fleet of three
beavers, as well as the Otter, and specialises in sightseeing flights around Mount
McKinley and glacier landings in Denali National Park.
52
N87AW. In service with Alaska West Air, Kenai, Alaska as a Vazar turbine.
54
N3904. Following its crash at Nikolai, Alaska on 28 December 2002, the wrecked
Otter was bought by Ed Tuohy and trucked from the crash site to his base at La
Cholla, Tucson, Arizona. He sold it on, to Rich Fowler and Carl Penner and it was
trucked to Heber, Utah where during 2005/2006 it was under rebuild. The buyers also
acquired what was left of Otter N567AA (327) in November 2005 from J.W.Duff
Aircraft Company of Denver and this was also trucked to Heber for use in the rebuild
of N3904.
58
N100BW. In service with Rainbow King Lodge Inc, Iliamna, Alaska. R-1340
engine.
59
C-GIWQ. In storage with Viking Air at Victoria, BC intended for future
conversion to a Viking Turbo Otter.
61
N61FE. In service with Rainbow King Lodge Inc, Iliamna, Alaska. R-1340 engine.
65
C-GOFF. Following its crash on 16 December 2003 at Blackwater Lake, Jellicoe,
Ontario the registration of the Otter to Huron Air & Outfitters Inc was cancelled on 7th
June 2005 as “aircraft destroyed”.
67
C-FHXY. In service with Lac Seul Airways, Ear Falls, Ontario. PZL engine.
During the winter of 2005/06 the Otter was overhauled at Silver Falls, Manitoba with
Winnipeg River Aircraft and repainted yellow overall with black cheatline, replacing
the red and white colour scheme it had carried for many years. After a busy summer
2006 season, it arrived at Sioux Lookout, Ontario 16 October 2006 for winter storage
with Northern Airborne Maintenance.
69
C-FCZP. In service with Walsten Air Service (1986) Ltd, Kenora, Ontario. R-1340
engine.
71
C-FCZO. In service with Osnaburgh Airways Ltd, Pickle Lake, Ontario. R-1340
engine.
73
C-FIFP. Following its crash near Little Grand Rapids, Manitoba on 25 June 1999
while operated by Blue Water Aviation Services, the wreck of this Otter remains in a
shed at Silver Falls, Manitoba where rebuilding has not yet commenced.
74
C-FMAU. Province of Manitoba Air Service. R-1340. Withdrawn from use and
parked outside the Air Service hangar at Winnipeg since February 2005. Advertised
for sale but not sold, and a decision is awaited as to its fate. The Manitoba
Government Air Service obtained funding to purchase a Twin Otter, and acquired C-
FWAH, Max Ward’s aircraft which had crashed and which was rebuilt for the Air
Service by Viking Air at Victoria, BC. At the same time, they also obtained funding
for the conversion of two of their three Single Otters to turbine, and selected C-
FMAX (267) and C-FODY (429). Unfortunately funding could not be obtained for C-
FMAU, which resulted in its being withdrawn from use.
75
C-FIGM. Following its crash at Uranium City, Saskatchewan on 16 November
1979 while operated by Norcanair, the wreck was sold to Southern Aviation Ltd of
Regina, Saskatchewan and parted out. It has now been established that at the time of
the crash, the Otter had total airframe hours of 15,826 and that after it was broken up,
the tail section was exported in November 1991 from Canada to Sweden where it was
used in the repair of Otter SE-KPB which had suffered some damage to the tail.
77
C-GCQA. North Star Air, Pickle Lake, Ontario. Vazar turbine.
89
C-FITF. Harbour Air, Vancouver. Vazar turbine. Fleet number 303.
90
C-FITS. An incident was recorded on 4 July 2005 when the Otter, operated by
Cochrane Air Services, departed Kesagami Lake with a pilot and four passengers on
board, en route to its home base at Cochrane, Ontario. While on final approach, the
engine lost power and a successful forced landing was made on Lillabell Lake. A
cylinder valve had failed. The engine was repaired.
C-FITS continued to fly for Cochrane Air Services until the end of the summer
2005 season, when it was sold. Its registration to Cochrane Air Services was cancelled
on 17 November 2005. The Otter was noted in early December 2005 at the AOG
facility at Kelowna, BC, paint stripped and in the course of conversion to a Walter
turbine. It was sold to Tofino Air Lines of Gibsons, BC, registered to them on 3
February 2006 and departed Kelowna on delivery early June 2006. The Otter is based
at Tofino on the west coast of Vancouver Island and joined Tofino Air Lines fleet of
four Beavers, used on charters and sight-seeing flights on Vancouver Island.
97
C-GGOR. The end of an era came at the conclusion of the summer season in
October 2004. After 23 years of operation, Whiteshell Air Service of Lac du Bonnet,
Manitoba retired its two Otters C-GGON (225) and C-GGOR (97). GOR was put into
winter storage at Lac du Bonnet and put up for sale. GON was also at Lac du Bonnet,
not yet rebuilt after its accident. Both aircraft were purchased by Adventure Air
(3097448 Manitoba Ltd) of nearby Silver Falls, Manitoba. GON was sold on but GOR
was registered to Adventure Air on 6 April 2005 and for summer 2005 went on lease
to Jackson Air Service of Flin Flon, Manitoba but was based at North Seal River
servicing the Gangler’s Fishing Lodge. GOR was stored at Flin Flon for the winter of
2005/06 and then converted to a Vazar turbine during the spring of 2006. It was
purchased by Jackson Air Services and registered to its new owners on 25 May 2006
and again serviced the Gangler’s Fishing Lodge for the summer 2006 season.
105
C-GVNL. Harbour Air, Vancouver. Vazar turbine. Fleet number 304.
106
N707KA. Kenmore Air, Seattle. Vazar turbine. Named “Captain Greg Munro”.
108
C-GMCW. Black Sheep Aviation & Cattle Company, Whitehorse, Yukon. Texas
Turbine conversion # 5.
111
C-FODQ. Chimo Air service, Red Lake, Ontario. R-1340.
113
C-GPHD. Osprey Wings, Otter Lake, Missinipe, Saskatchewan. Vazar turbine.
Named “What’s Up Doc”.
118
N104BM. Bald Mountain Air Services, Homer, Alaska. Texas Turbine conversion
# 11.
119
C-FBEU continued in service with Labrador Air Safari until the end of the summer
2004 season, when it was put into winter storage at the Air Saguenay base,
Chicoutimi, Quebec and put up for sale. It was advertised as having 16,062 hours on
the airframe and was sold in June 2005 to Lester L. Bingman of Dillingham, Alaska
for operation by his company Fresh Water Adventures Inc of Dillingham. The Otter,
on wheels, made the long cross-country flight all the way from Quebec to Kenai,
Alaska where it arrived on 15 June 2005. The Canadian registration was cancelled on
16 June and the following day the Otter was re-registered N81FW to Mr Bingman. At
Kenai it was put on floats and completed its delivery flight to its new base at
Dillingham. It still retained its R-1340 engine.
Fresh Water Adventures Inc is a long established bush operator, serving the Bristol
Bay and Kuskokwim areas of western Alaska. As the company’s website explains:
“We specialise in fresh water lakes and rivers and hold permits to operate within the
1.6 million acre Wood Tikchik State Park and the 4.2 million acres of the Togiak
National Wildlife Refuge. Our clientele consists of a variety of people, such as
Federal and State personnel carrying out their park management duties, independent
sports people and the adventurous guided rafters and tent based sports people. Our
unique Grumman (Goose) amphibious aircraft and new DHC-3 Otter will delight you
with their antique atmosphere and ability to fit the needs of our guests”.
N81FW spent the winter of 2005/06 at Courtenay, BC having work done on it by
International Aeroproducts Inc, before returning to Alaska. It fle w for Fresh Water
Adventures for the 2006 summer season and was then sold. It is recorded as being
exported to Canada on 7 November 2006 and on 1 December 2006 was registered C-
FHAD to Harbour Air of Vancouver.
125
C-GBNA. The Otter emerged from the hangar at Kelowna, BC in mid March 2005,
converted to a Walter turbine by AOG, and the returned to its base at Buffalo
Narrows, Saskatchewan to resume service with Voyage Air as a turbine.
128
N5322G, still operated by Alaska Cargo Service with the R-1340 engine, was
involved in a minor incident on 30th June 2005. The Otter had flown from its base at
Dillingham to Clark’s Point, Alaska. While departing the apron at Clark’s Point, due
to a crosswind, N5322G struck a parked vehicle with the left land ing gear, according
to a FAA report. It was soon back in service.
130
C-FKOA. Converted from a PZL to a Texas Turbine, conversion # 26, at Recon
Air, Geraldton, Ontario over the winter of 2005/06. The Otter continues in service
with Sioux Narrows Airways/Plummers Lodge.
132
C-FJCT. One of the four former Ethiopian Army Otters imported into Canada.
Registration cancelled 11 September 2000. Current status and whereabouts unknown.
Has not flown since importation.
135

C-FIUZ. Harbour Air, Vancouver. Vazar turbine. Fleet number 306.
140
C-FBEW. Following its crash on 17 March 1986 near its base at Pickle Lake,
Ontario and further damage caused when it was dropped by the helicopter attempting
to retrieve it from the crash site, the wreck was brought to Kuby’s Aircraft, Kenora,
Ontario where it lay for many years. It was one of four wrecked Otters sold to Recon
Air of Geraldton, Ontario in October 2005, and which were trucked to Geraldton for
rebuild.
141
N560TR. This Otter was converted to a PZL engine at Selkirk, Manitoba before
delivery to its new owners Jespersen Aircraft Services Ltd/Brooks Range Aviation of
Bettles, Alaska in September 2004.
142

C-FXUY. Thanks to Larry West who used to work for Ketchikan Air Services,
some new historical information has been provided, which corrects the information on
the CD concerning C-FXUY. Ketchikan Air Services had sent another of their Otters
N58JH (131), a turbine, on a contract to the Antarctic where it was damaged in
February 1992 in a remote location on the ice, and had to be left there over the winter.
As Larry West explains: “Our insurance company said they would not pay the claim
until they were able to have an adjuster examine the damage and determine if repairs
could be made. Everyone we talked to with experience in the Antarctic said that we
would be lucky to even find the airplane the next spring, let alone be able to repair it,
so being desperate for an aircraft for the busy upcoming summer season, we sued our
own insurance company to try to force them to pay off on the claim. We settled, with
the insurance company agreeing to find a suitable replacement aircraft for us”.
The replacement aircraft was 142, C-FXUY, another turbine which was leased from
Central Mountain Air in Smithers, BC. The aircraft was registered to North American
Gold Centre Inc of Las Vegas, Nevada in March 1992 as N214L for the purposes of
the lease, and was noted at Vancouver on 9 May 1992. The Otter arrived in Ketchikan
late May ’92, where the 7490 Bristol amphibious floats, which had been removed
from N58JH, were installed and N214L entered service with Ketchikan Air Services
on 10 June 1992 and continued in use until the end of September of that year. At that
stage 142 was sold by its owners, but the aircraft returned to Canada in April 1993,
when it joined the fleet of Air Tindi at Yellowknife, re-taking its original Canadian
registration C-FXUY.
C-FXUY was still in service with Air Tindi when it crashed on take off from the
water at Yellowknife on the evening of Friday 24 June 2005. The Otter was taking off
at 7.15pm that evening, en route to Blachford Lake Lodge, a fishing lodge on Great
Slave Lake with seven passengers on board and two pilots. XUY stalled, came down
on the water and over-turned. It struck hard on the port side, shearing off the wing. All
on board managed to exit from the aircraft and climb onto the floats. They were
rescued by local people by boat and taken back to the Air Tindi offices. The badly
damaged Otter was towed back to the shore and put into the Air Tindi hangar. A
company spokesman is quoted as saying: “It will definitely take some time to fix!”. In
May 2006 the wreck was seen sitting on a trailer at Yellowknife. According to the
owner of Air Tindi, the Otter will be rebuilt at some stage.
144
N93356. Ward Air’s Texas Turbine Otter (conversion # 7) crashed on landing on
31 July 2006 at Slate Cove in Berner’s Bay, some sixty miles northwest of Juneau,
Alaska. It was carrying a pilot and six passengers, who were employees of the
Kensington Gold Mine, being transported to the mine from Juneau. There was fog and
low cloud in the area when the Otter commenced its approach. The right float and
wing tip hit the water as the aircraft was in a right banked turn. The float was torn off,
as was the wing and the Otter sank, although all the occupants got out and there were
only minor injuries. The Otter however was very badly damaged with substantial
warping of the fuselage in addition to damaged wings, floats and engine. The sunken
Otter was brought to the surface by a crane and deposited on a landing craft and was
shipped south, taken to Kal Air at Vernon, BC for a complete rebuild over the winter
of 2006/07.
145
C-FFVZ. Jackson Air Services Ltd, Flin Flon, Manitoba. Vazar turbine.
147
C-GLPM. Propair Inc, Rouyn-Noranada, Quebec. Vazar turbine.

150
C-GLJI. Labrador Air Safari (1984) Inc, Baie Comeau, Quebec. R-1340.
151
144670. US Navy Test Pilots School, Patuxent River NAS. R-1340. The world’s
only active military Otter.
152

N90422. Kenmore Air, Kenmore, Washington. Vazar turbine.
157
C-FDAK. Air Saguenay (1980) Inc, Chicoutimi, Quebec. R-1340.
159
N959PA. Pro Mech Air, Ketchikan, Alaska. Vazar turbine.
165
C-FDDX. Hearst Air Service, Hearst, Ontario. Vazar turbine.
166
C-GGSL. Continued in service with Selkirk Air for 18 years until sold in May
2005. The buyer of the Otter was Pipestone Air Inc of Emo, Ontario to whom C-
GGSL was registered on 25 May 2005. Pipestone Air is associated with Pipestone
Fly-In Outposts and provides transportation for the company’s fishing lodge guests.
The Otter replaced Pipestone’s float-equipped Beech 18 CF-WYR, flying fishermen
to the company’s five fly- in fishing camps in the Wabakimi Provincial Park. R-1340.
172
C-GLCW. Leuenberger Air Service, Nakina, Ontario. Vazar.
174
C-GFTZ. Alpine Lakes Air, Smithers, BC. Texas Turbine conversion # 13. The
Otter was offered for sale in August 2006 through the agency of C&S Enterprises Ltd.
It was advertised as having at that stage 16,050 hours on the airframe and on 8100
Intaero floats. The advert also referred to the aircraft’s major overhaul in the year
2000, to include sound-proofed cabin, heavy duty floor, Baron STOL kit, Baron
upgross kit and Yukon Cargo Door.
183
N435B. Acquired by Kirk Thomas and leased to Pro Mech Air, Ketchikan, Alaska,
then with the PZL engine. During the winter of 2005/06, it was converted to a Vazar
turbine by International Aeroproducts Ltd, at Courtenay, BC and on 14 February 2006
was registered to Single Otter Leasing LLC. It returned to Ketchikan after conversion
to a turbine in April 2006, for continued lease to and operation by Pro Mech Air.
184
C-FQMN. Hawk Air, Wawa, Ontario. Converted to a Vazar turbine during the
winter of 2005/06 at Springer Aerospace, Bar River, Ontario.
198
53326 of US Army. The date of the crash which destroyed this Otter has been
established as 25 July 1957 and the location Brunico, Bolzano Province in the
mountains of northern Italy.
201
C-FAPQ. Arrived at Vernon, BC on a truck on 30 March 2005, having made the
long road journey from Hemet, California. The previous day its Canadian registration
had been cancelled. It was still in the all-white colour scheme and showed evidence of
its long period of storage, with birds nests visible in the engine cowling. At Vernon it
received a major refurbish by Kal Air, was converted to a Texas Turbine (conversion
# 17), was put on Wipline floats and received a new paint scheme. On 11 May 2005
marks N205RC were reserved for Rapids Camp Lodge Inc with an address in Dallas,
Texas and these marks were painted on the aircraft. The fishing lodge itself is situated
on the Naknek River Rapids, seven miles up river from King Salmon, Alaska. The
Otter was registered N205RC on 23 June 2005 and left Vernon, BC two days later for
Alaska, for the next phase of this aircraft’s long career. It services the fishing lodge,
flying guests in from Anchorage and also from the lodge to remote fishing sites in the
Bristol Bay area of Alaska.
205
C-FJZN. Labrador Air Safari (1984) Inc, Baie Comeau, Quebec. R-1340.
206
N455A. Arrived Vernon, BC late January 2005 to be converted to a Texas Turbine
by Kal Air, conversion # 16. It was registered to GCI Communication Corp of
Anchorage on 25 January 2005. After the turbine conversion was completed, the Otter
left Vernon at the end of April 2005 to return to Alaska and continued service of the
Wood River Lodge at Dillingham.
207
C-FTOK. North of Sixty Flying Services Inc, Obre Lake, Northwest Territories. R-
1340 engine.
208
C-FWEJ. During winter 2004/05 the Otter was converted to a Vazar turbine at Flin
Flon by Jackson Air Services. It was then sold to Wollaston Lake Fishing Lodge, but
during summer 2005 and 2006 it was operated by Jackson Air Services on behalf of
the Lodge, based at Wollaston Lake and flying the lodge’s fishing guests.
209
C-GBTU. Correcting the data on the CD, the Otter flew with its P&W R-1340
engine from May 1996 to July 1998 and was converted with the Polish PZL engine
during July 1998. It flew with this PZL engine until work started on converting it to a
Walter turbine in October 2004. On 20th October the Polish engine was removed in
the hangar at Silver Falls. Next the wings were removed and a Baron STOL kit
installed. During December the fuselage was primed and painted in a new colour
scheme. On 21st January 2005 the Walter engine arrived on the back of a truck, from
the Czech Republic via Kelowna and the following day it was fitted to the Otter. The
painting was then finished and the propeller was hung on 27 January ’05. The “new
and improved” C-GBTU was ready for action and after several test flights, it re-
entered service with Blue Water Aviation.
213
C-FWRA. White River Air, White River, Ontario. Vazar.
214

4R-ARA. Sri Lankan Air Taxi, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Vazar.
216
C-GLMT. Air Saguenay (1980) Inc, Chicoutimi, Quebec. Vazar.
218
C-FODT. Air Saguenay (1980) Inc, Chicoutimi, Quebec. Converted to a Texas
Turbine (conversion # 20) by Recon Air at Geraldton, Ontario during 2005. The Otter
was involved in a most unfortunate accident on 19 April 2006 when it crashed into C-
FKLC (255) another turbine Otter at Lac Lagopede, Quebec. KLC was owned by
Nordair Quebec 2000 Inc. Both Otters were on skis, operating from the frozen lake
supporting a mineral exploration camp. KLC was parked at the time. ODT arrived
from Chibougamau, could not stop in time, and collided with KLC, causing KLC
considerable damage, including its right wing which was torn off. Only the leading
edge of ODT’s wing was damaged and it was soon repaired and back in service with
Air Saguenay.
221
N50KA. Kenmore Air, Seattle. Vazar. For 2005 and 2006, flew in a K5 Radio
Station, Seattle logo colour scheme.
225
C-GGON. The Transportation Safety Board of Canada report into the accident to
the Otter on 22 May 2003 has been published and summarises the accident as follows:
“The float-equipped Otter departed the Lac du Bonnet water base at 11.00 hours that
morning with one pilot and three passengers on board, on a VFR flight to George
Lake. The pilot completed a normal take-off from the Winnipeg River in an easterly
direction and began a shallow climb over the shoreline. As the aircraft levelled off at
four hundred feet, there was a loud backfire followed by a complete loss of engine
power. The pilot force landed straight ahead. The aircraft struck several large trees
and came to rest in a swampy area. The aircraft struck the ground on its left side, both
wings broke off and the engine was buried in the swampy ground”. The Otter had
been flown that day by the owner of the company, who had extens ive flying
experience, with over 32,000 flying hours, of which over 8,000 were on the Otter. The
engine failure had occurred due to a failure of the number three cylinder.
The end of an era came at the conclusion of the summer season in October 2004.
After 23 years of operations, Whiteshell Air Service retired its two Otters. C-GGOR
(97) was put into winter storage at Lac du Bonnet, as usual, and put up for sale. C-
GGON (225) was still in the hangar at Lac du Bonnet but not yet rebuilt after its
accident and it too was offered for sale. The registration of both Otters to Whiteshell
Air Service was cancelled on 19th January 2005. Both aircraft were purchased by
Adventure Air (3097448 Manitoba Ltd) of nearby Silver Falls, Manitoba, who sold
them on.
By August 2005 C-GGON had arrived at International Aero Products Inc,
Courtenay, BC on Vancouver Island, where a rebuild commenced. The Canadian
registration was cancelled on 19 January 2006 and it was re-registered N3952B on 7
February 2006 to Single Otter Leasing LLC of Ketchikan (a Kirk Thomas company).
In the course of the rebuild it was converted to a Vazar turbine.
226
N226UT. Ultima Thule Outfitters, Chitina, Alaska. Texas Turbine (conversion #
2).
230
C-FCBA. Kenora Air Service Ltd, Kenora, Ontario. R-1340.
233
C-FQND. Waweig Air, Armstrong, Ontario. Vazar turbine.
239
C-FSOR. Nestor Falls Fly-In Outposts, Nestor Falls, Ontario. Converted to a Texas
Turbine (conversion # 18) by Recon Air, Geraldton, Ontario during 2005.
246
76118. US Army. Some additional historical information is available. This Otter
was delivered to the 937th Aviation Company for use on the IAGS. It crash landed in a
river in eastern Colombia on 15 February 1960 and was destroyed. There were no
injuries but the Otter crashed and burned. It was deleted from the Army inventory in
March 1960.
247
C-FYLZ. The Otter arrived at Silver Falls, Manitoba in July 2005 carrying Lynn
Lake Air Service titles. It remained parked at Silver Falls for the remainder of the
year, and that winter work commenced by Winnipeg River Aircraft to convert the
aircraft to a Walter turbine. The Otter was sold and the registration of Nueltin Lake
Outfitters, its previous owners, was cancelled on 15 November 2005. It was registered
to its new owners, Mattice Lake Outfitters Ltd of Armstrong, Ontario on 5 January
2006. It was sold on to Wabakimi Air of Armstrong to whom it was registered on 19
April 2006. The Otter was noted still at Silver Falls at the end of May 2006, its
conversion to a Walter turbine complete and it departed to its new base at Armstrong,
Ontario in early June and spent the summer of 2006 in service with Wabakimi Air.
250
VH-OTV. Vazar turbine. The Otter was noted at Broome on 19th May 2005, just
out of the hangar after overhaul and repaint into a new scheme of white overall, red
cheatline and red line across the tail. It was then the only Otter active in Australia,
with the departure of VH-OTR (373) to Canada. It was registered to Vazar (Pty) Ltd
of Broome on 23 February 2006 but continued in service with Broome Aviation.
252
N252TA. Talon Air Service, Soldotna, Alaska. Texas Turbine (conversion # 6).
254
N254AW. The Otter continued in service with Alaskan Wilderness Outfitting
Company as a piston Otter, flying out of its base at Cordoba, Alaska until February
2006 when on 5th February it arrived at Vernon, BC to be converted to a Texas
Turbine by Kal Air. This work was performed over the subsequent months, being
conversion number 25. On 8th July 2006 the Otter departed Vernon to return to Alaska
and resume service with Alaskan Wilderness Outfitting.
255
C-FKLC. Vazar. This Otter, flown by Nordair Quebec 2000 Inc, operated in the
very remote parts of northern Canada, from its base at Radisson, Quebec. Its
customers included mining exploration projects in Labrador, Nunavik, Nunavut and in
the James, Hudson and Ungava Bay regions, as well as native settlements. It also flew
hunters and fishermen and was IFR equipped.
These operations continued until a most unfortunate accident on 19 April 2006 at
Lac Lagopede in remote northern Quebec, 250 miles north east of Chibougamau. C-
FKLC was one of number of aircraft operating from the ice runway on the frozen
lake, supporting a mineral exploration camp. At the time of the accident, KLC was
parked, awaiting its next flight. Texas Turbine Otter C-FODT (218) of Air Saguenay
was landing on the lake inbound from Chibougamau when it could not stop and
skidded into the stationery KLC, the first ever recorded accident of one Otter crashing
into another. ODT only suffered some damage to the leading edge of its wing, which
was repaired, but KLC came out very much the worse. Its right wing was completely
knocked off. Fortunately there were no injuries.
Worse however was to follow. Nordair chartered a Bell 205 helicopter from Heli
Inter Air to airlift KLC back to base at Radisson for repair but en route the helicopter
dropped the Otter from quite a height. KLC fell into the bush and was totally
destroyed. Nordair subsequently purchased Vazar turbine Otter C-FSVP (28) to
replace it.
258
C-FXRI. Osprey Wings Ltd, Otter Lake, Missinipe, Saskatchewan, Vazar.
261
C-GKYG. Whilst still operated by Alkan Air of Whitehorse, Yukon Territory on
lease from Adventure Air, C-GKYG was involved in an accident at May Creek, a
remote strip thirty nautical miles north of Whitehorse on Monday 26th September
2005. The pilot and one passenger were not injured. The Otter was en route to
Anniversary Strip and was making an intermediate touch-and- go at the May Creek
strip for practice. The pilot was approaching the strip into the sun, and landed short of
the runway. The right gear struck a drainage ditch off the end of the runway. After
touchdown on the runway, the right gear collapsed, resulting in substantial damage to
the right wing and propeller. Alkan Air sent a Cessna 206 to May Creek to retrieve the
occupants and return them to Whitehorse. On 5th October 2005 the Otter was returned
to Whitehorse Airport, slung under a Sikorsky S-61 helicopter. The Otter was repaired
at Whitehorse and returned to service with Alkan Air, with whom it was still in use
during summer 2006 as a Walter turbine.
262
N338AK. Having been converted to a Texas Turbine Otter by Kal Air at Vernon,
BC (conversion # 14) over the winter of 2004/05 and repainted in a new colour
scheme, N338AK left Vernon (accompanied by N339AK number 454) in early March
2005, both returning to Juneau in the crates in which they had arrived. At Juneau they
were re-assembled and entered service with Wings of Alaska as part of its four-strong
turbo Otter fleet for summer 2005 and again in summer 2006.
263
N335AK. This Otter was sold by Wings of Alaska in September 2004 to a private
individual, reportedly to be based in the Bahamas to fly duck hunters to outlying
islands, evidently a common sport in the Bahamas. It was registered on 16 November
2004 to Wells Fargo Bank Northwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. It remained in storage
with Viking Air at Victoria, BC in a hangar until January 2006 when it departed on
delivery to the Bahamas.
The buyer of the Otter was Charles Bethel, the owner of the Flamingo Cay fishing
resort. To quote from the website: “Flamingo Cay is a small, exclusive fishing and
hunting resort nestled in a private secluded cove on the west side of Andros Island in
the Bahamas. The Cay was acquired by the Bethel family in the 1920s and maintained
since then for waterfowl shooting and fishing. Huge schools of medium to large
bonefish roam the pristine white sand flats of Andros Island. Teal and ducks are found
in great numbers, providing the wingshooter with an unforgettable experience”. The
resort is only accessible by air, so guests arriving at Nassau are collected and flown to
the lodge by the Otter, which is on amphibious floats and still retains its R-1340
engine.
This activity continued until 9 December 2006 when N335AK crashed on take off
from Flamingo Cay, Andros Island. Full details are not ye t to hand, but the Otter is
reported as “destroyed” in the accident and the pilot, the only occupant, to have been
rescued by passing watercraft.
264
76125. US Army. This Otter was delivered to the 3rd Aviation Company of the US
Army, based at Illesheim, Germany and was coded 16 with the unit. It suffered a hard
landing in a strong crosswind at Illesheim in April 1959, which resulted in the
collapse of the undercarriage. As James Elliott writes: “The aircraft was lifted onto a
flat-bed truck and hauled to a depot in Belgium (SABCA at Gosselies) where it was
repaired, repainted NATO grey and came back to the unit months later as good as
new”. It did not last too much longer, however, being deleted from the inventory in
April 1960 as the result of a crash, details unfortunately unknown.
267
C-FMAX. The Province of Manitoba Air Services arranged for two of its Otters to
be converted to Vazar turbines, with the PT-6 engine. The aircraft in question, C-
FMAX (267) and C-FODY (429) routed Winnipeg to Calgary on 30th March 2005
and then onwards via Golden, BC to Vancouver where they arrived on 2nd April.
ODY entered the Aeroflite Industries hangar at the Vancouver International Airport
where the conversion work was performed. MAX was converted by Viking Air at
Victoria, BC and was the first to be completed and passed through Calgary at the end
of May 2005 on its way back to Winnipeg.
The following month, June 2005, both MAX and ODY were flown to Wipaire at
Minneapolis, Minnesota where they were fitted with Wipaire 8000 amphibious floats,
before returning to Winnipeg. In January 2006 both Otters were flown to Rocky
Mountain Aircraft at Springbank, near Calgary, Alberta for a new avionics fit, then in
April to Red Deer, Alberta for repainting into a new red and white colour scheme,
then back to Springbank for finishing off and return to Winnipeg end April, in time
for the summer 2006 season. These two Otters are the very last Otters still in
government service in Canada, and as they have now been updated with turbine
engines and state of the art avionics, they are set for many more years of government
service. Both Otters were noted at the Lac du Bonnet summer base in mid May 2006,
undertaking training in advance of a busy operational summer season.
270

N270PA. Pantechnicon Aviation Inc, Glenbrook, Nevada. Vazar. Operated on lease
by Pro Mech Air, Ketchikan, Alaska.
273
C-FHPE. Transwest Air, La Ronge, Saskatchewan. Vazar.
274
It transpires that Otter C-GKPB was not in fact destroyed in the crash of May 1993
as described on the CD. The Otter was rebuilt during the early part of 2005 at
Courtenay, BC by International Aero Products Inc. It appears however that although
carrying the serial number 274, the majority of the aircraft used in this rebuild,
including the fuselage and wings, came from Otter serial 350, one of the former
Ethiopian Army Otters imported into Canada which had been lying in Vancouver for
some years. The original number 274 was very badly damaged in the May 1993 crash,
with little more than the tail section surviving that accident. The Otter currently
carrying the serial 274 appears to be very much a ‘composite aircraft’ created from
both the original 274 and 350.
In any event, the Otter was rebuilt in this manner at Courtenay and during the
rebuild converted to a PZL-engined Otter, also receiving the BARON STOL
modifications and was put on 8100 floats. The Canadian registration C-GKPB was
cancelled on 2 June 2005, fifteen years after the 1993 crash, and the rebuilt aircraft
was registered N6868B on 15th June 2005 to Kirk M. Thomas of Ketchikan, Alaska
who also owns Otter 183. N6868B was delivered north to Ketchikan that month and
went on lease to Pro Mech Air, flying its scheduled network and charters out of
Ketchikan. It was not long however before it was involved in an incident.
On Thursday 28th July 2005, flown by Pro Mech pilot Fred Wright and carrying ten
passengers, the Otter was returning to Ketchikan from the Misty Fjords National
Monument where it had been on a sight-seeing flight. While the Otter was near Cutter
Rocks in the Mountain Point area, about five miles south-east of Ketchikan, a flash
fire erupted near the windshield area of the cockpit. The pilot made an emergency
landing of the float-equipped Otter on the water and used the fire extinguisher to put
out the fire. However, he received second-degree burns while using the burning- hot
control yoke to land the Otter. Pro Mech Air dispatched a second Otter to bring the
pilot and his passengers back to Ketchikan and the pilot was then flown to a burns
centre in Portland, Oregon for treatment. The Southeast Stevedoring vessel ‘Shoreline
IX’ towed N6868B to Pro Mech’s hangar at Peninsula Point for repairs.
Repaired and restored to service, N6868B continued to fly for Pro Mech Air until
the end of the summer 2005 season. It spent the winter of 2005/06 parked out of
service at Peninsula Point. For summer 2006 it was in use based out of Ketchikan by
its owner Kirk M. Thomas, trading as Gateway Aviation in support of his fishing
lodges. That activity came to an end at the conclusion of the season towards the end of
September and by early October 2006 N6868B was again in outside storage for the
winter at the Peninsula Point maintenance facility.
276
C-GYYS. Northwest Flying Inc, Nestor Falls, Ontario. R-1340.
280
C-FMPX. Air Saguenay (1980) Inc, Chicoutimi, Quebec. R-1340.
282
C-FCEE. Johnny May’s Air Charter, Kuujjuaq, Quebec. R-1340.
284
C-GHAS. Harbour Air Ltd, Vancouver. Vazar. Fleet # 310

286

C-FLEA. Green Airways, Red Lake, Ontario. PZL
287

C-GYKO, River Air, Minaki, Ontario. Texas Turbine conversion # 4.
288

DQ-GLL. Pacific Island Air, Nadi, Fiji. Vazar.

289
C-FLAP. The Otter continued in service with Johnny May’s Air Charter based at
Kuujjuaq, Quebec but during 2006 was advertised for sale, on EDO 7170 floats, with
canoe rack and with an airframe time of 21,613 hours. It was sold to Nordplus 1988
Ltee of Schefferville, Quebec, to whom it was registered on 24 July 2006. This
company also operates Otter C-GFUT (404). R-1340.
292
C-FLLL. Osprey Wings Ltd, Otter Lake, Missinipe, Saskatchewan. Vazar.
294
VP-FAK. Having been retrieved from Deception Island, Antarctica where it had
lain for years, the Otter was brought by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) vessel
‘RRS James Clark Ross’ from Deception Island to Port Stanley on the Falkland
Islands, arriving 31 January 2005. It was stored on a trailer at Port Stanley for a time,
before being shipped to the UK on board the ‘RRS Ernest Shackleton’ arriving
Grimsby on 8th May 2005. It was then roaded to the De Havilland Aircraft Heritage
Centre at London-Colney for restoration to static display condition and went on long-
term loan to the Heritage Centre from the BAS.
There are some excellent photographs of the Otter arriving at the museum on the
website, www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk. As the website explains: “With the full co-
operation of BAS, this Otter will become the launch in Spring 2006 of the de
Havilland Aircraft Heritage Learning Experience. It will be the centre-piece of a
diaroma illustrating the world-class scientific achievements of the British Antarctic
Survey and the key role played by de Havilland aircraft for fifty years in supporting
this vital work”. According to BAS records, VP-FAK flew a total of 981 hours in the
Antarctic until it was grounded in March 1967.
296
N103SY. Mavrik Aire, Soldotna, Alaska. Walter turbine.
300
N79JJ. Prof Fate Inc, Bellingham, Washington. Vazar
302
C-GMDG. Fort Frances Sportsmen Airways, Fort Frances, Ontario. Vazar

307
N8510T. As at August 2005 the Otter was still in storage with Viking Air,
Victoria, BC. Work then started on its conversion to a turbine Otter and this work was
ongoing during 2006. The completion of the work awaits the final certification of the
Viking Turbo Otter conversion.
310
N49AW. The Otter landed on Okanagan Lake at Vernon, BC on 7 October 2005,
from where it was towed with the wings removed to the Kal Air facility. Over the
winter of 2005/06 it was to be converted to a turbine Otter and repainted. By late
November 2005 the PZL engine had been removed and the aircraft paint stripped.
Over the winter its conversion to a Texas Turbine was completed, conversion # 22.
The Otter was repainted in a dramatic new black and yellow colour scheme. It
departed Vernon at the end of May 2006 returning to Alaska, to resume service with
Alaska West Air, based out of Kenai, Alaska.
314
C-GCDX. Selkirk Air Services, Selkirk, Manitoba. PZL engine.
316
C-FSGD. Transwest Air, La Ronge, Saskatchewan. Vazar.
317
81701. The fate of this US Army Otter can now be revealed, thanks to Dave
Powers, its crew chief. The aircraft was one of four 17th Aviation Company Otters
flying in May 1962 from their base at Fort Ord, California to Fort Lewis, Seattle. The
flight followed the Californian Pacific Coast northbound, and the four aircraft stopped
to refuel at Crescent City, California, a civilian airfield near to the Oregon border.
81701 was the first of the flight to take off and had six souls on board. The Otter was
just airborne, some 200 feet high, when the engine failed. The pilot managed to put
the aircraft down on rough ground and all six occupants exited the aircraft, all with
varying degrees of injury, but sadly 81701 was totally destroyed in the post-crash fire.
324
C-FMPY. Nakina Outpost Camps & Air Service, Nakina, Ontario. Vazar
327
N567AA. This Otter, belonging to the Auburn Adventist Academy, Auburn,
Washington crashed on 4 September 1975 and was very badly damaged. The wreck
was bought by J.W.Duff Aircraft Company to whom it was regis tered in January 1976
and for the next 29 years it lay at their yard in Denver, Colorado. It was bought by
Rich Fowler and Carl Penner of Heber, Utah in November 2005 and trucked to Heber
for use in the rebuild of Otter N3904 (54).
329
C-GLFL. Air Saguenay (1980) Inc, Chicoutimi, Quebec. PZL engine.
333
N336AK. Wings of Alaska, Juneau, Alaska. Texas Turbine conversion # 9,
converted by Kal Air at Vernon, BC over the winter of 2003/04. N336AK returned to
Vernon, landing on Okanagan Lake on 28 September 2005 at the end of its flight from
Juneau. From the lake it was towed to the Kal Air facility where it was to spend the
winter of 2005/06 being repainted and having a new interior installed and other work
carried out. It departed Vernon on 24 April 2006 to Vancouver and then onwards back
to its Juneau base.
336
CF-MIQ. Nakina Outpost Camps & Air Service, Nakina, Ontario. Vazar
338
N338D. Having lain at Sterling, Alaska since its crash in 1992, in August 2005 the
Otter was sold by All West Freight Inc to a Mike Spisak of Kotzebue, Alaska who
also bought Otter N26DE (26) at the same time. Both Otters were carried off in trucks
from Sterling. N338D was registered to Northern Aircraft Leasing LLC of Cheyenne,
Wyoming on 8 August 2005.
N338D was rebuilt over the winter of 2005/06, retaining the R-1340 engine, and
entered service with Mavrik Aire of Soldotna, Alaska who also operate Walter-
powered turbine Otter N103SY (296). N338D continued in service with Mavrik Aire
until an incident on 22 August 2006, when it suffered engine failure approximately six
miles northeast of the Kenai Municipal Airport, and force landed on swampy terrain.
It was to remain there for some time. As the local newspaper, the ‘Peninsula Clarion’
reported on 8th September ’06:
“A single engine Otter that emergency landed on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge
wetlands more than two weeks ago remains waiting among the moose and the birds
while its owners and Refuge officials puzzle how to remove it. Because of its size and
the terrain it is stuck in, the plane could continue to wait until the snow comes, said a
park ranger. It could be out there for a while because basically its just sitting out there
in the swamp”. The newspaper report said that the aircraft’s owners had to obtain a
salvage and removal permit to ensure that it would be removed safely and with as
little environmental damage as possible. “So here they are with this plane that is intact
and not very damaged out there when don’t want it. It’s a tough situation to be in”, the
park ranger added. A photograph showed N338D in a very attractive blue and white
colour scheme but with no titles, sitting apparently undamaged on its floats on the
soggy vegetation.
The Otter was much needed to assist with Mavrik Aire’s charters, flying hunters to
the Kotzebue area during the fall of 2006, but unfortunately could not be liberated
from the swamp. A mechanic was sent in to replace the blown cylinder in the engine
which had caused the forced landing. An attemp t was then made to fly the Otter out of
the swamp after a period of heavy rain but without success. Three months after the
forced landing, N338D was still stuck in the swamp. It had been further damaged by
high winds while on the ground.
The saga came to an end in mid December 2006, when the Otter was dis-assembled
and flown out by helicopter. A Bell 204 of Northern Pioneer Helicopters was used.
On 11 December the engine was airlifted, followed by the Otter itself the next day,
taken to Kenai for rebuild.
339
N41755. Having lain at Palmer, Alaska since recovered from the crash site,
following its accident on 22 July 1992 while operated by Woods Air Fuel, the Otter
was sold to Harbour Air of Vancouver in November 2005 and trucked all the way
from Palmer to the Vancouver International Airport, where over the winter of 2005/06
it was rebuilt by Aeroflite Industries and at the same time converted to a Vazar turbine
Otter. It was registered to Harbour Air Ltd, Vancouver as C-FHAX on 25 January
2006 and entered service as fleet # 313.
347
C-FPAD. One of the four former Ethiopian Army Otters imported into Canada,
this Otter was noted at the Aeroflite Industries hangar at the Vancouver International
Airport in September 1999, in the workshop, and still in its Ethiopian Army colour
scheme. Registration C-FPAD was cancelled 11 September 2000. The current status
and whereabouts of this Otter in unknown.
348
C-GLAB. Wilderness Air Ltd, Vermillion Bay, Ontario. R-1340 engine.
349
C-FZDV. One of the four former Ethiopian Army Otters imported into Canada.
Having lain in a hangar at Vernon, BC for some years in a dis-assembled state, there
was renewed activity with the Otter when on 7th April 2005 it was registered to
Norman Seguin with an address at Spruce Grove, Alberta and was reportedly for sale.
The Otter was taken in August 2005 from its hangar to the Kal Air facility at Vernon
where over the winter of 2005/06 it was rebuilt as a Vazar turbine with a PT-6 engine
and painted in the colour scheme of its new owner, Air Tindi. The Otter was bought to
replace Air Tindi’s own turbine Otter C-FXUY (142) which had crashed on 24 June
2005. Registered to Air Tindi Ltd on 8 June 2006, C-FZDV departed Vernon on 17
June ’06 on delivery to Air Tind i, with whom it entered service at Yellowknife,
Northwest territories, on floats from the downtown seaplane base.
350

C-FZDW. One of the four former Ethiopian Army Otters imported into Canada,
the Otter was noted at the Aeroflite Industries hangar at the Vancouver International
Airport in September 1999, in the workshop, still in its Ethiopian Army colour
scheme. The registration was cancelled on 21 September 2000. The Otter was
subsequently trucked to Courtenay, BC on Vancouver Island, to the facility of
International Aeroproducts where it was used in the rebuild of Otter serial 274. It
would appear that by far the majority of Otter 274, now registered N6868B, is
comprised of Otter serial 350, including the entire fuselage and wings. The original
number 274 was very badly damaged in an accident in May 1993, with little more
than the tail section surviving that accident. In any event, according to the paperwork,
Otter 350 has ceased to exist and the rebuilt 274 now flies as N6868B for its owner
Kirk M. Thomas based at Ketchikan, Alaska.
353
C-GVNX. Labrador Air Safari (1984) Inc, Baie Comeau, Quebec. R-1340 engine.
355
C-GOPP. The Otter is mentioned in a much-recommended book entitled “So you
want to be a Ferry Pilot” by Spike Nasmyth, who was the owner of Orca Air based at
Port McNeill, BC on Vancouver Island. In January 1985 the Otter was advertised for
sale by sealed-bid tender by its then owners, the Ontario Provincial Police, together
with a holding of spare parts. Mr Nasmyth travelled to Sault Ste.Marie where C-
GOPP was located. He made an offer of $180,000 Canadian which was accepted and
in March 1985 he returned to Sault Ste.Marie to collect his Otter. The delivery routing
was first to Wawa then Thunder Bay-Winnipeg-Regina-Lethb ridge and over the
Rockies to Chilliwack, BC and then to the company’s base at Port McNeill. The Otter
was prepared for service at nearby Coal Harbour.
The book contains a most readable account of the flight as well as describing the
author’s many interesting ferry flights in other aircraft. Otter OPP served with Orca
Air for nearly two years on charter work. The company’s biggest customer was a
logging company, for which the aircraft performed many flights, cargo trips and crew
moves. Orca Air then sold the Otter to the Tangalooma Resort in Australia. The Otter
was subsequently returned to Canada and now flies as a Vazar turbine Otter with
Harbour Air, Vancouver, fleet # 305.
357
C-FHAA. Harbour Air, Vancouver, Vazar. Fleet # 309.
359
C-GMLB. Waweig Air, Armstrong, Ontario. Vazar
361
N361TT. Renew Air Taxi, Dillingham, Alaska. Texas Turbine conversion # 8.
362
N362TT. The Otter arrived at Vernon, BC by truck minus its wings in mid
December 2005 where over the winter of 2005/06 it was converted to a Texas Turbine
by Kal Air, conversion # 21. On 8th July 2006 it was loaded onto a trailer and left
Vernon for the long road journey to Anchorage, where it was re-united with its wings,
re-assembled and re-entered service with R&J Aircraft Leasing Corp, flying for
lodges and other operators in need of extra Otter capacity.
363

C-GSMG. Sioux Narrows Airways, Selkirk, Manitoba. The Otter flies for
Plummers Lodge, based at Great Bear Lake in the Northwest Territories each
summer. During 2005 the Otter was converted to a Texas Turbine, conversion # 19,
by Recon Air at Geraldton, Ontario.
365
C-GUTL. Fort Frances Sportsmen Airways, Fort Frances, Ontario. Vazar
366
C-GGSC. Air Mont Laurier (1985) Inc, Ste.Veronique, Quebec. R-1340
371
C-GEND. Whistler Air Services, Whistler, BC. Vazar
373

VH-OTR. The Otter continued in operation with Cairns Seaplanes until December
2004, when it was put up for sale. It was noted at Cairns early February 2005 being
crated prior to leaving Australia by ship headed for Canada. The crate left Cairns on
11 February ’05. The Otter was advertised for sale by C&S Enterprises, Aircraft
Brokers, on their website starting in April 2005. It had 16,596 hours total time, was on
stretched EDO 7170 floats and had an asking price of US$350,000. The departure of
VH-OTR left only one Otter active in Australia, this being VH-OTV (250) based at
Broome in Western Australia.
The owner of VH-OTR then decided to sell the aircraft himself, which appears to
have resulted in something of a delay in the departure of the aircraft from Australia. In
any event, the Otter is recorded as being imported into Canada on 25 October 2005
and after seven weeks in a Russian container ship, it arrived in two containers at
Victoria, BC where it was unloaded. It had been purchased by Forde Lake Air
Services of Hornepayne, Ontario where it was to join the company’s existing fleet of a
beaver and a Cessna 185.
At Victoria the Otter was registered to Glenn Pearce of Pearce Aero Services, who
were re-assembling the Otter for its new owner. It was registered C-FBEO, taking its
original Canadian registration, on 1 February 2006. After the Otter had been re-
assembled, overhauled and repainted, it was registered on 13 April 2006 to Forde
Lake Air Services and set off from Victoria on delivery to its new owners. It went to
work out of Government Lake, Hornepayne, Ontario, flying from the lake on floats,
back in Canadian skies after nearly ten years in Australia.
379
C-FNFI. Lac La Croix Quetico Air Services, Lac La Croix, Ontario. R-1340
382
C-FHAS. The Otter was eventually sold and was registered on 4 April 2005 to its
new owners, North Pacific seaplanes of Prince Rupert, BC. It arrived in Vancouver on
wheels on 8 April, was put on amphibious floats and headed north for its new base at
Prince Rupert. Vazar.
385
Some additional historical information is available. The Otter was delivered to the
US Army on 22 August 1960 as tail number 92230 and having been fitted with radios
suitable for an overseas deployment, was shipped to Libya where it arrived at
Wheelus Air Base, Tripoli in April 1961, where it was re-assembled. Its first
operating unit was the 572nd Engineer Platoon, as described on the CD. It spent all its
service life with the US Army based in Libya and Iran and finally Germany before
being sold surplus as N80945 and returned to Canada where it flew as C-FDNK, again
as described on the CD.
C-FDNK. The Otter was converted by Viking Air with a PT-6A-35 and made its
first flight from Victoria, BC as a turbine Otter in July 2005. It finished its flight test
programme prior to Christmas 2005 and during 2006 was awaiting final official
certification of the Viking Turbo Otter conversion.
386
C-GHYB. Blue Water Aviation Services, Silver Falls, Manitoba. PZL
387
C-GIIQ. After its accident on 11 March 1994 at Sandy Bay, Saskatchewan, the
wreck was bought by Kuby’s Aircraft and brought to their yard at Kenora, Ontario
where it lay, in the company of other wrecked Otters, for years, intended for an
eventual rebuild. In the event, Kuby’s Aircraft decided to concentrate on rebuilding
Beech 18s instead and sold their stock of wrecked Otters to Recon Air of Geraldton,
Ontario for rebuild. The Otters, including C-GIIQ, were loaded onto trucks and left
Kenora in October 2005 en route to Geraldton. IIQ was advertised for sale on the
C&S Aircraft Brokers website in November 2006, with total airframe time of 12,845
hours. Photographs showed it in the hangar at Geraldton in the course of a complete
rebuild to “like new” status, with a choice of turbine engine for the purchaser, Garrett
or Pratt.
392
N1018B. Emerald Air Service Inc, Homer, Alaska. R-1340
393
4R-ARB. Sri Lankan Air Taxi, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Vazar
394
N3125N. The PZL-powered Otter continued in service with Alaska Air Taxi
during 2005 and 2006, based at Anchorage on wheels. It was involved in an accident
on 2 September 2006 when it was deployed to the north of Alaska, flying freight out
of Barrow to outlying communities. The Otter was landing on runway 23 at Wainright
Village when it ran off the runway, knocked down a light, rolled down an
embankment and went into a ditch. The flight was arriving at Wainright from the
Wiley Post/Will Rogers Memorial Airport at Barrow. In the crash, the left main
landing gear assembly was fractured and displaced aft against the fuselage. The left
aileron was damaged, the fuselage firewall was buckled and the fuselage suffered
some structural damage. The propeller, engine and left wingtip struck the ground.
On 20th September 2006, after delays in getting recovery equipment to Wainright,
the Otter was recovered and disassembled for removal to Anchorage for repair.
Lynden Air Cargo Hercules N406LC was used to retrieve the Otter. Having finished
its scheduled freight run to Kotzebue on Saturday 23 September, it then flew to
Wainright to collect the Otter and flew it back to Anchorage.
397
C-FQEI. The Otter was damaged in an accident at Louie Lagoon on Vancouver
Island on Thursday 4 August 2005. As the company’s website explains: “Air Nootka
transports hikers, campers and surfers from its base at Gold River to the outside
waters of Nootka Island, to Louie Lagoon and the kick off point to hiking the Nootka
Trail. A short thirty minute hike along a flagged path through the high timbers and
low fern growth of the rain forest brings those with an adventurous spirit to the sandy
beaches of the open Pacific Ocean”.
The Otter, with one pilot and eight hikers on board, suffered engine failure and was
attempting an emergency landing on the lagoon when it hit a sandbar and overturned.
The hikers were uninjured while the pilot sustained a gash to his forehead which
required a few stitches. Campers and staff from Esperanza, a Christian ministry/bible
camp near Zeballos, who were camping near Ferrer Point, watched the Otter go down
while they were canoeing in the bay and raised the alarm. 442 Squadron at CFB
Comox launched a Buffalo aircraft and a Cormorant helicopter but the rescue was
called off when the Rescue Co-Ordination Centre was advised that everyone was
safely ashore and that Air Nootka was sending its own aircraft to return them to Gold
River.
On Saturday 6 August, the Otter was airlifted from the crash site by Hayes Heli
Logging Sikorsky S-61N helicopter C-FHHM and flown to Zeballos. From there it
was trucked to Sealand Aviation at Campbell River to await a decision on its fate.
Photographs showed considerable damage to the floats and underside of the Otter. It
became the property of the insurance company, who offered it for sale. It was then
trucked to Victoria, BC where it remained for a time with Victoria Air Maintenance.
On 17 January 2006 the Canadian registration was cancelled and the damaged Otter
was sold to a Mr Urs Wamister of Switzerland. It was loaded into a container at
Victoria, brought to Vancouver and then right across the country by rail to Montreal.
From here it was shipped to Europe, and taken by truck to Hereg in Hungary for
rebuild.
Located at Hereg is the aircraft restoration shop of Karl Birczak. Currently the shop
was working on the restoration of a Junkers Ju-88 of the Luftwaffe for the Norwegian
Aviation Museum, the bomber having crashed in Norway during the war. Clearly this
shop has experience of dealing with unusual aircraft types. Otter 397 certainly had
returned to Europe in unusual circumstances.
401
C-GBQC. Fort Frances Sportsmen Airways, Fort Frances, Ontario. R-1340
403
C-FODW. Jackson Air Services, Flin Flon, Manitoba. Vazar. The Otter is
operated for Wollaston Lake Lodge.
404
C-GFUT. Nordplus (1988) Ltee, Schefferville, Quebec. R-1340.
Nordplus also operated a DHC-2 Beaver C-FODG which was destroyed in an
accident twenty miles northwest of the Schefferville base on 1st September 2005. The
accident report into the Beaver crash published by the Transportation Safety Board of
Canada gives a good account of the company’s activities and those of its Otter.
“The outfitter company has its base of operations at Squaw Lake, three miles from
Schefferville. The company sells hunting and fishing excursion packages for various
sites north of Squaw Lake. Nordplus is an air carrier company that supplies air
services to the outfitter, carrying clients, staff, baggage and supplies to the various
camps throughout the outfitter’s territory. Most of the work is seasonal, beginning in
June and ending in September. Nordplus operates a Cessna 185, a Beaver and an
Otter”. On the day in question, the Beaver departed Squaw Lake for a round trip VFR
flight to two wilderness camps, Camp 2 and Camp Pons. The pilot reported having
landed at Camp 2 by means of radio relay through the company Otter. The passengers
deplaned from the Beaver, which then took off for Camp Pons for a caribou meat pick
up. Given the strong south-east winds, it is estimated that C-FODG would have taken
two hours to complete the return flight from Camp Pons to Squaw Lake.
Otter C-GFUT completed a similar flight from the north to Squaw Lake, leaving
shortly after the Beaver. The flight took the Otter just over two hours. Weather had
deteriorated significantly while heading south causing the Otter pilot to deviate from
the direct route to maintain visual reference with the ground. The Beaver also
encountered this adverse weather and made a precautionary landing on Elross Lake to
await a clearance in the weather. The pilot of the Beaver spoke to the Otter and was
advised that the weather remained poor and that a flight from Elross Lake to Squaw
Lake should not be attempted. The forecast for Squaw Lake was continuing low
ceilings, low visibility in rain showers, strong winds and turbulence.
Unfortunately the Beaver did attempt the flight but struck a ridge and was
destroyed, the pilot sadly being killed in the crash. When C-FODG failed to arrive at
Squaw Lake base camp, rescue efforts were undertaken. Weather continued to be poor
until 18.30 hours that evening when the Otter pilot and an observer took off to start a
search. The evening search was unsuccessful but rescue efforts continued the next
morning, when the crash site was found.
405
C-GUTW. Harbour Air, Vancouver. Vazar. Fleet # 302.
406
SE-KOX. After nearly 15 years service with the parachute club in Sweden, the
Vazar turbine Otter was sold, to Wipaire Inc of South St.Paul, Minnesota. They
employed a ferry pilot for the delivery flight. The Otter left Stockholm- Bromma
Airport on 20 February 2005 and flew that day to Helsinki, and then to Oslo where it
overnighted. The following day it flew from Oslo to Wick in northern Scotland, where
it again overnighted, flying on the next day to Akureyri, Iceland where it arrived that
evening. It took off from Akureyri at 08.36 hours on 23 February en route to Sondre
Stromfjord, Greenland. Onward routing was via Goose Bay and it eventually arrived
at St.Paul, Minnesota on 28 February. The Swedish registration was cancelled on 3
March and the next day the Otter was registered N406H to Wipaire Inc. With the
departure of the Otter from Sweden, Europe lost its last active Otter.
In May 2005 the Otter was advertised for sale by Wipaire, with an asking price of
$725,000. It was advertised as having 10,300 hours on the airframe and could also be
purchased for $890,000 on Wipline 8000 straight floats or for $980,000 on Wipline
8000 amphibious floats. The Otter was sold to Harbour Air of Vancouver and
registered C-FHAH to its new owners on 6 January 2006. It was delivered
Minneapolis to Calgary and then on 2 March Calgary to Golden, BC en route to
Vancouver. It entered Harbour Air’s hangar at the Vancouver International Airport
where it went a refurbish over the subsequent months, prior to entering service with
Harbour Air.
407
N3125S. Kenmore Air Harbour Inc, Kenmore, Washington. Vazar.
Some additional historical information has become available, taken from “Success
on the Step”, the excellent history of Kenmore Air. N3125S was the company’s first
Otter and was purchased as Kenmore Air needed a larger aircraft, as passenger loads
often exceeded what a Beaver could carry. The market for Otters was apparently soft
at that time during the 1980s, when an Otter on floats could be had for $100,000 and
on wheels for much less. A Kenmore Beaver at the time cost upwards of $300,000.
Newcal Aviation had purchased seven surplus Otters from the Canadian military,
which had been sitting in open storage at Decatur, Texas for some years. Early in
1988 Kenmore Air noticed an advertisement for the sale of these Otters and arranged
to buy N3125S. It had 600 hours life left on its engine, so the company figured they
could fly it for three years before the expense of an overhaul would arise. A Kenmore
pilot was dispatched to Decatur, picked up the Otter , which was still in CAF colours
and on wheels, and flew it to the Renton Airport in Seattle.
Rather than incur the substantial cost of dismantling the Otter and bringing it by
barge to Kenmore Air Harbor, it was decided to fly the Otter to Kenmore and land it
in a freight yard beside the Air Harbor, but which was only 700 feet long. This was
done on 2 June 1988, the book providing a fine description of the landing, achieved
on the third attempt, the Otter grinding to a halt after heavy breaking in a cloud of
dust just feet from the boundary fence. According to the manufacturer, the Otter’s
minimum landing distance is 810 feet, but N3125S had achieved its dramatic arrival
in less than 700 feet.
The Otter was then lifted by crane across a water channel into the Kenmore Air
Harbor yard and put on Bristol 71710 floats. It was registered to Kenmore Air Harbor
Inc in October 1988 and entered service. It apparently did not have sufficient power to
fly off Lake Union and so was only used flying services from the larger Lake
Washington. For the summer of 1989 and again in 1990, N3125S went on lease to
Ward Air in Alaska, flying out of Juneau. It flew again for Kenmore Air for the
summer of 1991, but over the winter of 1991/92 was converted to a Vazar turbine
with the PT-6 engine. It has been in service with Kenmore Air ever since. It has
sported a series of “logo” colour schemes. During the summer of 2002 it had the
University of Washington “Huskies” paint scheme. During summer 2004, having
received the scenic windows conversion, it sported a “Seattle Hospitality” scheme and
for summer 2006 had a “metronatural.com” logo scheme, this being Seattle’s
Convention and Visitors Bureau.
409
N409PA. Pantechnicon Aviation, Carson City, Nevada. Vazar. Operated by Pro
Mech Air, Ketchikan on lease.
410
C-FVVY. Big River Air, Fort Smith, Northwest Territories. Vazar. During the
winter of 2005/2006 the Otter operated out of Temiscamie River, to the north of
Chibougamau, Quebec.
411
C-FODV. Wilderness Air Ltd, Vermillion Bay, Ontario. R-1340.
An accident to the Otter occurred on 1 October 2004 at Vermillion Bay. To quote
from the report: “The Otter was on the take off run into wind when a gust of wind
lifted the left wing. The right wing contacted the water and the aircraft pitched
forward and overturned. The pilot, the only occupant, was not injured but the aircraft
sustained substantial damage”. The Otter was repaired by Recon Air at Geraldton,
repainted in a revised colour scheme but still retaining the basic overall yellow of its
days with the Ontario Provisional Government.
412
C-FNWX. The Otter arrived back at its Sioux Lookout, Ontario base in mid May
2005 to continue its career with Slate Falls Airways as a Vazar turbine Otter.
418
N337AK. Wings of Alaska, Juneau, Alaska. Texas Turbine conversion # 10. The
Otter arrived Vernon, BC early October 2006 for a repaint and installation of a new
interior by Kal Air over the winter of 2006/07.
419
N727KT. Rustair Inc, Anchorage, Alaska. Vazar. Operated by K2 Aviation,
Talkeetna, Alaska which is a division of Rustair.
420
C-GLCO. Labrador Air Safari (1984) Inc, Jonquiere, Quebec. Texas Turbine
conversion # 23.
422
C-GLCP. The Otter returned to the Harbour Air hangar at the Vancouver
International Airport in September 2005 and over the winter of 2005/06 was
converted to a Vazar turbine Otter and received the scenic window conversion. It flies
for Harbour Air as fleet number 311.
425
N2899J. Rusts Flying Service Inc, Lake Hood, Anchorage, Alaska. Vazar.

427
N644JJ. Aircraft Investments LLC, Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Vazar
428
C-GLCS. Leuenberger Air Service, Nakina, Ontario. Vazar. During the summer of
2006 the Otter flew on lease to Alkan Air based at Whitehorse in the Yukon.
429
C-FODY. The Province of Manitoba Air services arranged for two of its Otters to
be converted to Vazar turbines. The aircraft in question, C-FMAX (267) and C-FODY
(429) routed Winnipeg to Calgary on 30 March 3005 and then onwards via Golden,
BC, to Vancouver where they arrived on 2 April. C-FODY entered the Aeroflite
Industries hangar at the Vancouver International Airport where the conversion work
was performed. C-FMAX was converted by Viking Air at Victoria, BC and it passed
through Calgary at the end of May 2005 on its way back to Winnipeg. C-FODY was
noted outside the Aeroflite hangar at Vancouver on 18 June 2005, its turbine
conversion completed and about to depart for its return trip to Winnipeg.
Later in June, both MAX and ODY were flown to Wipaire at Minneapolis,
Minnesota where they were fitted with Wipaire 8000 amphibious floats, before
returning to Winnipeg. In January 2006 both Otters were flown to Rocky Mountain
Aircraft at Springbank near Calgary for a new avionics fit, then in April to Red Deer,
Alberta for repainting into a new red and white colour scheme, then back to
Springbank for finishing off and return to Winnipeg end April, in time for the summer
2006 season. These two Otters are the very last Otters still in government service in
Canada and as they have now been updated with turbine engines and state of the art
avionics, they are set for many more years of government service.
431
N17689. Correcting the information on the CD, the Otter did indeed fly up from
Africa and arrived at Fairoaks, England on 26 June 1975. However, a few days later it
was dismantled, packed into a crate and shipped to Canada, and not flown across the
Atlantic as stated. Also, updating the information on the CD, the registered owner was
changed from Katmai Express Inc to Katmai Adventure Trips Inc with an address in
Everett, Washington on 18 May 2005, although N17689, a Vazar Otter, remains based
in Alaska.
434
N491K. Katmai Air Leasing, Anchorage. PZL.

436
C-FAYR. North of Sixty Flying Service, Obre Lake, NWT. R-1340.
437
C-FSOX. Leuenberger Air Service, Nakina, Ontario. Vazar
438
C-FPEM. Thunderbird Aviation, Stony Rapids, Saskatchewan. R-1340. The Otter
flies for Athabaska Fishing Lodges.
439
C-FPEN. Fast Air Ltd, Winnipeg. Texas Turbine conversion # 12. The Otter is
based at Baker Lake, Nunavut. An incident was recorded on 17 August 2004. The
Otter had landed at an exploration strip 140 miles south west of Baker Lake. As the
aircraft was turning in the soft ground at the edge of the strip, a gust of wind lifted the
tail. The propeller struck the ground and sustained damage. The engine and propeller
were changed and the Otter returned to service.
445
C-FRHW. The Otter continued in service with Inland Air Charters based out of
Prince Rupert, BC until March 2006 when it arrived at AOG Aircraft at Kelowna, BC
to have some work done on return to its lessor and before sale to a new owner. The
Otter, on straight floats, landed on Duck Lake and was then put on beaching gear and
brought to the AOG facility where over the next few weeks it had the BARON STOL
modifications incorporated. It was then registered to its new owners, Central Flyways
Air Inc, Trading as Venture Air, of Thompson, Manitoba on 19 April 2006. It left
Kelowna on its delivery flight on 24 April 2006 and John Olafson was privileged to
be present and he describes the scene:
“I followed C-FRHW on its very interesting journey from Kelowna Airport to
Duck Lake. The machine they use to move floatplanes is ideally suited to this task and
the operator did an incredible job of safely moving the Otter to the lake. Its first
obstacle was a very rough cattle guard to cross and a dusty trip through a cattle ranch,
then a crossing over a railway whose crossing was dismantled, followed by a trek
through a ginseng farm and finally to the lakeshore where it was fuelled and then
launched and flown out. A very rough trip but expertly carried out by the AOG crew.
Some places along that ‘road’ the Otter was banked over at close to 45 degrees. A few
poplar trees had to be sacrificed along the way. A job well done and another Otter
goes back to work”. John’s excellent photos of this and many other Otters can be seen
on www.airliners.net and www.dhc3otter.com.
447
C-FDJD. The Otter was sold to Recon Air Corporation of Geraldton, Ontario and
registered to that company on 3 February 2005 as C-FDJD, the first time this forty –
one year old Otter had ever carried a Canadian registration. During 2006 the Otter was
again advertised for sale, the accompanying photographs showing the aircraft paint
stripped into natural metal, with all previous structural damage fully repaired, in the
hangar at Geraldton. The Otter was without engine, awaiting whatever powerplant a
purchaser specified. Total airframe time to date was given as 5,900 hours, with the
aircraft “stored since 1979”. By November 2006, it was still in the hangar without
engine, but painted in an attractive blue and white colour scheme.
451
C-FAZW. Labrador Air Safari (1984) Inc, Jonquiere, Quebec. R-1340.
452
C-FDIO. Waasheshkun Airways, Baie-du-Poste (Mistassini Lake), Quebec. In
November 2006 this Otter was converted to a Vazar turbine, conversion number 80
for Vazar.
454
N339AK. Having been converted to a Texas Turbine Otter (conversion # 15) by
Kal Air at Vernon, BC over the winter of 2004/05 and repainted into a new colour
scheme, N339AK (and N338AK serial 262) both left Vernon early March 2005 in the
crates in which they had arrived, and were returned to Juneau where they were re-
assembled and entered service with Wings of Alaska as part of its four strong turbo
Otter fleet for summer 2005, and again for summer 2006.
456
C-FUKN. Northway Aviation, Pine Dock, Manitoba. R-1340.
458
C-FAZX. Still grounded at Laval, Quebec following the collapse of the Orenda
engine project.
460

C-FDIZ. Osprey Wings, Otter Lake, Missinipe, Saskatchewan. Vazar.
461
N929KT. Rust Air Inc, Anchorage. Operated by K2 Aviation, Talkeetna, a division
of Rust Air Inc. Vazar.
463
C-FASZ. Osprey Wings Ltd, Otter Lake, Missinipe, Saskatchewan. Vazar.
465
N342KA. The Otter flew again for Pro Mech Air during 2004 on lease. In April
2005 the Otter was advertised for sale by Ketchum Air. It had 21,451 hours on the
airframe and an asking price of $775,000. It was sold later that year to Pro Mech Air.
It was extensively overhauled by Pro Mech Air at their Peninsula Point, Ketchikan
maintenance base in readiness for operation as part of their Otter fleet for summer
2006. Vazar. On 24 October 2006 the Otter was registered to P M Holdings LLC of
Ketchikan, the holding company of Pro Mech Air.
466
C-FVQD. The Otter was at the AOG facility at Kelowna, BC in February 2005
with its engine removed for inspection purposes. It is the first Walter engined Otter to
have been operated in a salt water environment on lease to Inland Air Charters at
Prince Rupert on the Pacific Coast, and inspection was necessary to see how it had
fared. Its lease to Inland Air had ended, and by mid April VQD had departed from
Kelowna and returned to its base at Silver Falls, Manitoba. For summer 2005 it was
leased by its owners, Adventure Air, to Northway Aviation based at Pine Dock,
Manitoba.
An incident was recorded on 10 June 2005 at St.Andrews Airstrip, Winnipeg. The
Otter, on amphibious floats, had just undergone maintenance to replace the brake
pads, and was on a taxi run on runway 18 to seat the new pads. The calliper seals on
the left brake leaked brake fluid onto brake assembly and at the end of the taxi run a
small fire occurred on the left brake. The fire self extinguished. The left tire and brake
seals were replaced and the Otter returned to service. VQD continued flying for
Northway Aviation for the remainder of the summer 2005 season, before being parked
for the winter of 2005/06 at its Silver Falls base. It was again leased by Adventure Air
to Northway Aviation for the summer of 2006, serving the native communities of
Little Grand Rapids and Pauingassi.
END
Any updates and further Otter information, current and historic, would be much
appreciated.
Karl Hayes,
Crakaig,
Killiney Hill Road,
Killiney,
County Dublin,
Ireland
E- mail: karl.hayes@goregrimes.ie
Copyright 2007.



Source: http://www.oldwings.nl/content/dhc3/dhc3_update_2.pdf

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