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(Research on hyperglycemia caused by saluretics).
Il Policlinico. Sezione medica, {Policlinico−Med}, Apr 1967, vol. 74, no. 2, p. 59−90, ISSN: 0048−4717.
Author(s)
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Clinical trial of an association of hydrochlorothiazide and triamterene).
Il Policlinico. Sezione medica, {Policlinico−Med}, Apr 1967, vol. 74, no. 2, p. 107−18, ISSN: 0048−4717.
Author(s)
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Clinical experience with a new cardioactive glycoside: Proscillaridin A).
Il Policlinico. Sezione medica, {Policlinico−Med}, Jun 1966, vol. 73, no. 3, p. 139−81, ISSN: 0048−4717.
Author(s)
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Erythropoietin in clinical practice).
Klinicheskaia meditsina, {Klin−Med−Mosk}, 2007, vol. 85, no. 9, p. 30−7, 99 refs, ISSN: 0023−2149.
Author(s)
Baksheev−V−I, Kolomoets−N−M.
Abstract
In numerous studies, erythropoietin (EP) has been shown to be a universal protective tissue cytokine,and EP receptors have been shown to exist in a lot of tissues. The pleiotropic effects of EP (the anti−inflammatory effect, angiogenesis, anti−apoptosis etc.) make clinical application of EP (especiallyrecombinant EP, REP, and EP analogs without erythropoietic activity) promising in different diseases.
Possibilities provided by REP application in neurology, cardiology, hematology, oncology, and otherclinical areas are being studied intensively. Clinical studies of EP are now solitary, and they should becontinued; new EP analogs with specified qualities and selective mechanisms of action should bedeveloped. This review discusses the modern state of EP investigation and possibilities provided by itsclinical application.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Adverse drug events in hospitalized cardiac patients.
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The American journal of cardiology, {Am−J−Cardiol}, 1 Nov 2007 (epub: 21 Aug 2007), vol. 100, no. 9, p.
1465−9, ISSN: 0002−9149.
Author(s)
Fanikos−John, Cina−Jennifer−L, Baroletti−Steven, Fiumara−Karen, Matta− Lina, Goldhaber−Samuel−Z.
Abstract
Little information is available concerning adverse drug events (ADEs) in cardiac patients. Therefore, theinvestigators report the results of cardiac patients in an ADE surveillance program, with the intent ofreducing the frequency of future events. All reported adverse drug reactions and medication errors incardiac patients over a 5−year period at Brigham and Women's Hospital were reviewed. There were 547ADEs in cardiac patients, a rate of 1.9 events for every 100 patient admissions. Preventable ADEs mostoften occurred during medication administration (34.2%), with wrong rate or frequency of medicationadministration the most widespread event. Cardiovascular agents (29.8%), anticoagulants (28.5%), andantimicrobial agents (10.8%) were the most common drug classes associated with ADEs. Injury orprolonged hospitalization occurred in 5.3% of patients. ADEs occurred most frequently on the admissionday, on weekdays, and in the early morning hours. Peak frequencies of ADEs coincided with nursing shiftchanges. In conclusion, ADEs occur often in hospitalized cardiac patients and affect 2 of every 100patient admissions. Given the high percentage of ADEs associated with drug administration, moreresources should be directed at this step of medication use. Focusing interventions around nursing shiftchanges may further enhance preventive strategies.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Critical factors in case management: practical lessons from a cardiac case management
program.

Disease management : DM, {Dis−Manag}, Aug 2007, vol. 10, no. 4, p. 197−207, 30 refs, ISSN:1093−507X.
Author(s)
Stafford−Randall−S, Berra−Kathy.
Abstract
Case management (CM) is an important strategy for chronic disease care. By utilizing non−physicianproviders for conditions requiring ongoing care and follow−up, CM can facilitate guideline−concordantcare, patient empowerment, and improvement in quality of life. We identify a series of critical factorsrequired for successful CM implementation. Heart to Heart is a clinical trial evaluating CM for coronaryheart disease (CHD) risk reduction in a multiethnic, low− income population. Patients at elevated cardiacrisk were randomized to CM plus primary care (212 patients) or to primary care alone (207). Over a meanfollow−up of 17 months, patients received face−to−face nurse and dietitian visits. Mean contact time was14 hours provided at an estimated cost of $1250 per patient for the 341 (81%) patients completingfollow−up. Visits emphasized behavior change, risk−factor monitoring, self−management skills, andguideline−based pharmacotherapy. A statistically significant reduction in mean Framingham riskprobability occurred in CM plus primary care relative to primary care alone (1.6% decrease in 10−year CHD risk, p = 0.007). Favorable changes were noted across individual risk factors. Our findings suggestthat successful CM implementation relies on choosing appropriate case managers and investing intraining, integrating CM into existing care systems, delineating the scope and appropriate levels of clinicaldecision making, using information systems, and monitoring outcomes and costs. While our population,setting, and intervention model are unique, these insights are broadly relevant. If implemented withattention to critical factors, CM has great potential to improve the process and outcomes of chronicdisease care. Grant ID: R01 HL070781, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Multi−dimensional fingerprints of Japan Jiuxin pill).
Yao xue xue bao = Acta pharmaceutica Sinica, {Yao−Xue−Xue−Bao}, Dec 2006, vol. 41, no. 12, p.
1161−5, ISSN: 0513−4870.
Author(s)
Zhang−Min, Wang−Yi−Ming, Luo−Guo−An.
Abstract
AIM: To develop HPLC−UV/ELSD and HPLC−UV/MS3 fingerprints of Japan Jiuxin pill usingmulti−dimensional hyphenated methods and study on its chemical base. METHODS: Separation wasperformed on Altima C18 analytical column (250 mm x 4.6 mm ID, 5 microm). The mobile phasesconsisted of water containing 0.2% formic acid and acetonitrile was used as gradient elute. The flow ratewas 1.0 mL x min(−1). An electrospray ion trap mass spectrometer was utilized for qualitative analysisand both positive and negative secondary ion scan mode were applied. RESULTS: HPLC−UV/ELSD andHPLC−UV/ MS3 fingerprints of Japan Jiuxin pill with well separation and reproducibility were obtained.
Totally 21 components in the complex formula were identified and the chemical structural information ofglycocholic acid and its isomer were suggested. CONCLUSION: The research is propitious to offer aneffective and reliable pattern for analyzing Japanese Kampo Medicines as well as its quality control.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Cardiologists use pulmonary artery catheter information to make homogenous
treatment decisions.

Journal of intensive care medicine, {J−Intensive−Care−Med}, Sep−Oct 2007, vol. 22, no. 5, p. 251−6,ISSN: 0885−0666.
Author(s)
Jain−Manu, Upadhyay−Daya, Balagani−Rajesh, Jovanovic−Borko, Fintel− Dan.
Abstract
Medical intensivists make heterogenous decisions using pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) data in medicalintensive care unit patients. The object was to determine if cardiologists given PAC data from critically illcardiology patients make uniform management choices. A survey questionnaire containing 3 coronarycare unit (CCU) clinical vignettes was designed and mailed to board−certified cardiologists who aremembers of the American College of Cardiology. Twenty board− certified medical intensivists were alsoasked to complete the vignettes. Each vignette contained PAC data and one−half of the surveyscontained echocardiographic (ECHO) information. Every respondent was asked to select 1 of 6interventions for each vignette. In 2 of 3 vignettes 1 intervention was selected by more than 70% ofcardiologists. In the third vignette, 1 intervention was selected by more than 50% of cardiologists. For each vignette, 1 intervention was selected by at least 75% of medical intensivists. There was nosignificant difference in the distribution of management choices between the ECHO and the non−ECHOsubgroups. There is relative homogeneity in selecting an intervention based on PAC data amongcardiologists and medical intensivists in CCU patients and is probably due to patient−related factors. Thepresence of ECHO information did not change the intervention selected. Cardiology patients mayrepresent an ideal group in which to evaluate PAC efficacy.
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(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Review of the registry's first year, data collected, and future plans.
Heart rhythm : the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, {Heart−Rhythm}, Sep 2007 (epub: 25 Jul2007), vol. 4, no. 9, p. 1260−3, ISSN: 1547−5271.
Author(s)
Hammill−Stephen−C, Stevenson−Lynne−Warner, Kadish−Alan−H, Kremers− Mark−S, Heidenreich−Paul,Lindsay−Bruce−D, Mirro−Michael−J, Radford− Martha−J, Wang−Yongfei, Lang−Christine−M,Harder−Joel−C, Brindis− Ralph−G.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Ultrasound accelerates thrombolysis of acutely induced platelet−rich thrombi similar to
those in acute myocardial infarction.

Circulation journal : official journal of the Japanese Circulation Society, {Circ−J}, Oct 2007, vol. 71, no.
10, p. 1643−8, ISSN: 1346−9843.
Author(s)
Kawata−Hiroyuki, Naya−Noriyuki, Takemoto−Yasuhiro, Uemura−Shiro, Nakajima−Tamio, Horii−Manabu,Takeda−Yukiji, Fujimoto−Shinichi, Yamashita−Atsushi, Asada−Yujiro, Saito−Yoshihiko.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although sonothrombolysis has been studied for development of recanalization that issafer and more efficacious than the methods currently used, there have been no studies of the efficacy ofsonothrombolysis for the platelet−rich thrombi that typically cause acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Theeffects of adding ultrasound (US) to pharmacological lysis of platelet−rich thrombi was examined in arabbit model of femoral artery occlusion. METHODS AND RESULTS: In 35 rabbits, the right femoralartery was balloon−injured repeatedly at 4− week intervals to induce platelet−rich thrombi. Two hoursafter the induction of occlusive thrombi, 27,500 IU/kg tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were injected viaan ear vein, with or without transcutaneous US (continuous wave, 1 MHz, 0.75 W/cm2), or 13,750 IU /kgtPA was administered with US (n=10). Significantly higher rates of successful thrombolysis (ThrombolysisIn Myocardial Infarction grade 3) were observed with US (90.0%) than without it (10.0%), irrespective ofthe dose of tPA used (p<0.01). The peak flow velocity in affected femoral arteries was significantly higherwith US (p<0.01), and histological examination confirmed complete dissolution of thrombi. However, thethrombi were not affected by US alone (n=5). CONCLUSIONS: US facilitates thrombolysis of platelet−richthrombi and could be a useful component of thrombolytic therapy following AMI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Anticoagulants in heart disease: current status and perspectives.
European heart journal, {Eur−Heart−J}, Apr 2007 (epub: 10 Apr 2007), vol. 28, no. 7, p. 880−913, 253refs, ISSN: 0195−668X.
Author(s)
De−Caterina−Raffaele, Husted−Steen, Wallentin−Lars, Agnelli−Giancarlo, Bachmann−Fedor,Baigent−Colin, Jespersen−Jørgen, Kristensen−Steen− Dalby, Montalescot−Gilles, Siegbahn−Agneta,Verheugt−Freek−W−A, Weitz− Jeffrey.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Bayer withdraws heart surgery drug.
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BMJ (Clinical research ed.), {BMJ}, 17 Nov 2007, vol. 335, no. 7628, p. 1015, ISSN: 1468−5833.
Author(s)
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) The Lithuanian Heart Association. Interview by Robert Short.
Dialog eLinks
Circulation, {Circulation}, 6 Nov 2007, vol. 116, no. 19, p. f112−4, ISSN: 1524−4539.
Author(s)
Serpytis−Pranas, Glaveckaite−Sigita, Gladynaite−Velderbeek−Julita.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Two different therapeutic strategies in ICD lead defects: additional combined lead
versus replacement of the lead.

Journal of cardiovascular electrophysiology, {J−Cardiovasc− Electrophysiol}, Nov 2007 (epub: 30 Aug2007), vol. 18, no. 11, p. 1172−7, ISSN: 1540−8167.
Author(s)
Wollmann−Christian−G, Böcker−Dirk, Löher−Andreas, Paul−Matthias, Scheld−Hans−H,Breithardt−Günter, Gradaus−Rainer.
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Implantation of an additional HV−P/S lead versus extraction of the defective HV−P/S leadand implantation of a new one is one possible therapeutic approach in cases of a defective high− voltagepace/sense lead (HV−P/S). No information is available on potential differences in clinical outcome inthese different approaches. METHODS: Between January 2000 and February 2006, 86 patients withHV−P/S lead defect received either an additional transvenous HV−P/S lead (n = 33, group 1) or theHV−P/S lead was replaced (n = 53, group 2). The duration of the initially implanted leads was significantlydifferent in the two groups (7.4 +/− 2.9; group 1 and 4.1 +/− 3.4 years; group 2). The outcome of thesetwo groups of patients was retrospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Seventy− three patients (85%) surviveduntil the end of follow−up of 29 +/− 15 (group 1) and 33 +/− 21 (group 2) months (P = ns), respectively.
Thirteen patients died: six in group 1 and seven in group 2 (P = ns). Fourteen patients experiencedperioperative complications (group 1: six; group 2: eight; P = ns). ICD system−related complicationsoccurred in 22 patients (group 1: seven; group two: 15; P = ns). The event−free cumulative survival ofpatients with additional and replaced HV−P/S lead for postoperative events (including death) after 1, 2,and 3 years was 82%, 70%, 70%, and 86%, 81%, 66%, respectively (P = 0.93). CONCLUSIONS:Implantation of an additional HV−P/S lead or replacement of the HV−P/S lead in case of HV−P/S leadfailure is statistically not different concerning mortality and morbidity. There are no predictors for furtherlead defects. Implantation of an additional HV−P/S lead should not be recommended in young patients orpatients with greater likelihood of living many years. Predictors for death were an age over 70 years andrenal insufficiency.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Treatment of massive cardiac thrombi in a patient with protein C and protein S
deficiency.

Blood coagulation & fibrinolysis : an international journal in haemostasis and thrombosis,{Blood−Coagul−Fibrinolysis}, Oct 2007, vol. 18, no. 7, p. 699−702, ISSN: 0957−5235.
Author(s)
Paç−F−Aysenur, Cagdas−Deniz−N.
Abstract
Myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy is characterized by dilatation of all four cardiac chambers anddecreased systolic function of the heart, especially in the left ventricle. In this report we presented apatient with myocarditis or dilated cardiomyopathy and deficiency of protein C and protein S withbiventricular multiple intracardiac thrombi. Standard heparin infusion and acetyl salicylic acid was begun.
On the 10th day of hospitalization the right ventricular thrombus disappeared, and on the 24th day allthrombi in the left ventricle disappeared. During the treatment we did not observe any complication suchas hemorrhagia or embolism. We think that patients with dilated cardiomyopathy or myocarditis should beevaluated for hemostatic disorders, and should be anticoagulated if any of these disorders are presented.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a novel therapeutic target in heart diseases.
Cardiovascular & hematological disorders drug targets, {Cardiovasc− Hematol−Disord−Drug−Targets},Sep 2007, vol. 7, no. 3, p. 205−18, 162 refs, ISSN: 1871−529X.
Author(s)
Toth−Ambrus, Nickson−Philip, Mandl−Adel, Bannister−Mark−L, Toth− Kalman, Erhardt−Peter.
Abstract
The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle responsible for the synthesis and folding ofproteins as well as calcium storage and signaling. Perturbations of ER function cause ER stress leadingto the unfolded protein response (UPR), which includes inhibition of protein synthesis, protein refoldingand clearance of misfolded proteins. The UPR aims at restoring cellular homeostasis, however,prolonged ER stress can trigger apoptosis. ER stress−induced apoptosis has been implicated in thepathogenesis of various diseases such as brain ischemia/reperfusion, neurodegeneration, diabetes and,most recently, myocardial infarction and heart failure. Initial events leading to UPR and apoptosis in theheart include protein oxidation and disturbed calcium handling upon ischemia/reperfusion, and forcedprotein synthesis during cardiac hypertrophy. While XBP−1 and ATF6− mediated induction of ERchaperones seems to protect the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury, the PERK/ATF4/CHOP branchof the UPR might transmit proapoptotic signals. The precise mechanism of ER stress−inducedcardiomyocyte apoptosis remains elusive, however, recent data suggest that the mitochondrial apoptoticmachinery is recruited through the upregulation of Puma, a proapoptotic member of the Bcl−2 family.
Importantly, suppression of Puma activity prevented both ER stress and ischemia/reperfusion−inducedcardiomyocyte loss, highlighting the ER stress pathways as potential therapeutic targets in cardiovasculardiseases. Grant ID: HL−68126, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Human embryonic stem cell−derived cardiomyocytes for heart therapies.
Cardiovascular & hematological disorders drug targets, {Cardiovasc− Hematol−Disord−Drug−Targets},Jun 2007, vol. 7, no. 2, p. 145−52, 69 refs, ISSN: 1871−529X.
Author(s)
Siu−Chung−Wah, Moore−Jennifer−C, Li−Ronald−A.
Abstract
Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despitesubstantial improvements in acute management, survivors of myocardial infarction often progress to heartfailure. Since adult cardiomyocytes (CMs) do not regenerate, their loss permanently compromisesmyocardial contractile function. Heart transplantation is currently the last resort for end−stage heartfailure, but is hampered by a severe shortage of donor organs and rejection. Cell−based therapies are apromising alternative: Various cell types such as human fetal CMs, skeletal muscle myoblasts andsmooth muscle cells have been tested but these approaches are also limited by cell availability or sideeffects (e.g. due to their non− cardiac identity). In recent years, clinical studies exploiting adult bonemarrow mesenchymal stem cells for transplantation in patients with coronary artery disease havereported favorable outcomes but their cardiomyogenic ability is limited. By contrast, human embryonicstem cells (hESCs), derived from the inner cell mass of blastocyst− stage embryos, are pluripotent andcan self−renew and differentiate into all cell types including CMs. Furthermore, hESC−derived CMs (hESC−CMs) are viable human heart cells that can functionally integrate with the recipient organ aftertransplantation. This article reviews the current state and hurdles of hESC−CM research, as well as theirtherapeutic potentials and limitations. Grant ID: F32 HL078330, Acronym: HL, Agency: United StatesNHLBI Grant ID: R01 HL72857, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Are stem cells drugs? The regulation of stem cell research and development.
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Circulation, {Circulation}, 31 Oct 2006, vol. 114, no. 18, p. 1992−2000, ISSN: 1524−4539.
Author(s)
Abstract
Stem cell research and its clinical application have become political, social, and medical lightning rods,polarizing opinion among members of the lay community and among medical/scientific professionals. Apotpourri of opinion, near−anecdotal observation, and scientifically sound data has sown confusion inways rarely seen in the medical arts and sciences. A major issue is regulation, with different aspects ofstem cell research falling within the purview of different government agencies and local offices. Anoverarching clearinghouse to review the field and recommend policy is lacking. In the following pages, Itouch on the societal framework for regulation, the known and potential risks and benefits ofcardiovascular stem cell therapies, whether stem cells should be regulated as drugs or in analogy todrugs, and if there is to be regulation, then by whom. In so doing, I refer to the stem cell literature only asit relates to the discussion of regulation because this is not a review of stem cell research; it is an opinionregarding regulation. Grant ID: HL−28958, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI Grant ID:HL−67101, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) The future of therapeutic myocardial angiogenesis.
Shock (Augusta Ga.), {Shock}, Oct 2006, vol. 26, no. 4, p. 332−41, 84 refs, ISSN: 1073−2322.
Author(s)
Boodhwani−Munir, Sodha−Neel−R, Laham−Roger−J, Sellke−Frank−W.
Abstract
Despite improvements in its medical and surgical management, ischemic coronary disease remainsresponsible for significant morbidity, mortality, and economic burden in developed nations. Therapeuticmyocardial angiogenesis is an attractive treatment option for patients with end−stage coronary diseasewho have failed percutaneous and surgical methods of revascularization. Over the past decade, ourunderstanding of the biology of new blood vessel formation has improved significantly, and consequently,the use of growth factors to induce myocardial angiogenesis has been attempted in preclinical and clinicaltrials. Although growth factor therapy had demonstrated tremendous success in animal models, clinicaltrials have shown limited benefit in patients with coronary disease. Vascular endothelial growth factorsand fibroblast growth factors are perhaps the most potent inducers of angiogenesis that have been usedin animal models, and the only ones that have been used in clinical trials. This review outlines the biologyof new vessel formation and the effects of these growth factors in the context of myocardial angiogenesiswith an emphasis on the effects on the endothelium. It also provides a brief overview of deliverystrategies and summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence relating to exogenous growth factordelivery for myocardial angiogenesis. Lastly, we discuss the limitations and future challenges ofangiogenic therapy. Grant ID: HL04095−06, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI Grant ID: R01HL69024, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Metabolic therapy for heart disease: impact of trimetazidine.
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Heart failure reviews, {Heart−Fail−Rev}, Dec 2005, vol. 10, no. 4, p. 281−8, 59 refs, ISSN: 1382−4147.
Author(s)
Sabbah−Hani−N, Stanley−William−C.
Abstract
Grant ID: P01 HL074237−03, Acronym: HL, Agency: United States NHLBI.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) Role of the T744C polymorphism of the P2Y12 gene on platelet response to a 600−mg
loading dose of clopidogrel in 597 patients with non−ST− segment elevation acute
coronary syndrome.

Thrombosis research, {Thromb−Res}, 2007 (epub: 06 Mar 2007), vol. 120, no. 6, p. 893−9, ISSN:0049−3848.
Author(s)
Cuisset−Thomas, Frere−Corinne, Quilici−Jacques, Morange−Pierre− Emmanuel, Saut−Noémie,Lambert−Marc, Camoin−Laurence, Vague−Irène− Juhan, Bonnet−Jean−Louis, Alessi−Marie−Christine.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Variability in platelet response to clopidogrel and its clinical relevance have been welldescribed. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, the T744C polymorphism ofthe P2Y12 receptor gene has been associated with enhanced platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers,suggesting a possible mechanism for modulation of clopidogrel response. AIM OF THIS STUDY: Toassess whether the clopidogrel response may be influenced by the T744C P2Y12 gene polymorphism inpatients with non ST elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE ACS). METHODS: 597 NSTE ACSpatients were included in our study and were divided into 3 groups: CC homozygotes, CT heterozygotesad TT homozygotes. All patients received loading doses of 600 mg clopidogrel and 250 mg aspirin atleast 12 hours before blood samples. Clopidogrel response was assessed by post−treatment ADP 10micromol/L−induced platelet aggregation (ADP−Ag), VASP phosphorylation (PRI VASP) and P−selectinexpression (PS). Clopidogrel resistance was defined by persistence of High Post−treatment PlateletReactivity (HPPR=ADP−Ag>70%). RESULTS: Significant variability in the distribution of plateletparameters was observed in the overall study population. No significant difference in platelet parameterprofiles was observed within patients having the same genotype, for ADP−Ag (p =0.39), PRI VASP(p=0.97) and PS (p=0.62). The genotype frequencies of the T744C polymorphism of the P2Y12 genewere similar in responders and non responders defining by HPPR (p=0.75). CONCLUSION: Our studydid not show any influence of the T744C polymorphism of the P2Y12 receptor gene on clopidogrelresponse assessed by ADP−Ag, PRI VASP or P−selectin expression in NSTE ACS patients.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Evaluation of new technologies in interventional treatment of certain heart diseases).
Zhonghua nei ke za zhi (Chinese journal of internal medicine), {Zhonghua−Nei−Ke−Za−Zhi}, Mar 2007,vol. 46, no. 3, p. 181−3, ISSN: 0578−1426.
Author(s)
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA) (Cardiac sarcoidosis −− own experiences).
Pneumonologia i alergologia polska : organ Polskiego Towarzystwa FtyzjopneumonologicznegoPolskiego Towarzystwa Alergologicznego i Instytutu Gruzlicy i Chorób Pluc, {Pneumonol−Alergol−Pol},2007, vol. 75, no. 1, p. 100−7, 39 refs, ISSN: 0867−7077.
Author(s)
Martusewicz−Boros−Magdalena, Wiatr−Elzbieta, Piotrowska−Kownacka− Dorota, Tomkowski−Witold,Roszkowski−Sliz−Kazimierz.
Abstract
Cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis may be incidentally discovered without any symptoms of the disease.
When undiagnosed and untreated it is potentially fatal. Although there is no recommended strategy forthe diagnosis, the introduction of newer technology is promising and may be useful for early diagnosis ofsarcoid heart disease and for the evaluation of response to therapy. We present a case of 53−years oldwoman, with asymptomatic cardiac arrhythmias and x−ray chest picture changes without any respiratorysymptoms. Further assessment and the use of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging allowed a diagnosisof cardiac sarcoidosis to be made.
Publication date
(COPYRIGHT BY National Library of Medicine, Bethesda MD, USA)

Source: http://www.mtw.nhs.uk/downloads/Heart%20Disease%20therapies%20122007.pdf

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